Recommended photography books

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Radiohead
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Post by Radiohead »

Absolutely masses - 3 levels of instruction and info (beginner, intermediate, advanced) covering everything right up to post-processing and the digital darkroom. All with easy to understand language and lots of images and figures showing what's what. Well worth the £28 IMO, and the reviews I read before buying seem to agree.

Also covers installation on 3 PC's. I've bought that and the John Hedgecoe book above, along with Thom Hogan's D70 guide and I'm learning a lot very fast. I can't stop reading!
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Post by Guest 37141 »

My Girlfriend just brought me a couple of good books for my birthday. Both by ILEX.

The Digital SLR handbook & Surreal Digital Photography. Quite impressed.
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Post by Andrew70 »

gregh wrote:I mentioned this book earlier. Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

I have just received it, it cost £11.99 and from first looks appears really easy to understand, every piccie in the book has an explanation and the aperture and shutter speed he used. He also has some easy to understand analogies as well as real world example he gets you to do with various aperture and shutter speeds as you work through the book.

Seems exactly what I wanted, easy to understand and good examples!

regards,

greg

Thought I'd bump this thread to add my own praise for this book.

I bought it without realising it had been mentioned here but I can only echo what has already been said about it.
It's aimed at the beginner end of the ability scale but more experienced snappers might still pick up a tip or two.
The examples used to illustrate the text are both relevant and easy to understand. This is in no small part due to the very untechnical and comprehensive way in which the concepts and techniques are described.
I'm only 50 pages into it so far but already I can tell it's going to be a very useful reference book.

(It's head and shoulders above another book I bought at the same time: Lighting for Nude Photography :n0rty: )

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Post by Guest 3281 »

wilber wrote:The Photoshop CS Book for Digital Photographers

good book at a good price


Got to agree with this selection, great book :thumbs:
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Post by Guest 4147 »

Darren A wrote:Got to agree with this selection, great book :thumbs:


The only problem I find with this book is the relentlessly "zany" writing style of the author. Scott Kelby is one of those prattish American authors who thinks that the best way to hold the attention of a reader is to fill the pages with endless puns and japery. If you're anything like me, you'll be ready to punch him by the end of chapter three.

Anyway, jolly-jolly tittersome stupidity aside, the content of the book is excellent, and it's packed with excellent and very useful tips on enhancing your digital images using Photoshop.
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Post by Lujan82 »

gregh wrote:
Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson


Ordered this yesterday as a result of the recommendations here. Thanks! :thumbs:
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Post by Guest 993 »

Another book to recommend...
Digital Photographer's Handbook, Tom Ang

Same publishers as the John Hedgecoe book and it's a very similar style book. Concentrates on the digital side of things, so it's a lot of chapters about digital cameras and scanning, but like Hedgecoe's book it has a shed load of chapters with tips on technique for shooting particular subjects and situations (mostly independent of digital, just the examples are shot with digital cameras), and then loads more on how to manipulate those images digitally with a lot of tips. Some nice explanations on resolutions and colour profiling and how to compensate for errors during shooting, digital artefacts, etc.

It's kind of like a half photography and half photoshop book.

Picked it up for the bargain price of £7.99 (this is a big hardback book) in a cheap shop in Guildford :thumbs:
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Post by Guest 4639 »

Apart from the over-zany but otherwise excellent Scott Kelby book mentioned above, I also got a lot out of Galen Rowell's "Inner Game of Outdoor Photography". It's a collection of his articles, rather than a book of direct instruction, but as a complete newbie as I was at the time, it really helped me think more like a photographer. Given the amount I'd spent on a digital SLR, the fifteen quid spent on this book to improve my head was a real bargain.

As a counterpoint to the praise for Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure", I bought his book "Learning to See Creatively" and it was a complete waste of money. I can't believe people would learn anything from it unless they were congentially blind. I suppose whilst the technical side of photography can be taught well, the more creative aspect of it is harder to pin down and pass on.

One more recommendation is the Phaidon 55 series (a collection of photos and an essay about individual photographers like Dorothea Langeand Eugene Richards) - stupidly, stupidly cheap for what you get. Again, these don't directly teach you anything, but they're a great collection of photos from across a photographer's whole career, allowing you to see how someone's style develops - as well as exposing you to lots of superb pictures.
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Post by Guest 993 »

worth a bump :D
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Post by Roy »

Excellent idea for a thread :thumbs:
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Post by sworrall »

For anyone aiming to buy the book Understanding Exposure I would hold off for a bit. I went to Borders to see if they sell it last week and they told me a re-print was coming out on August 11th so im waiting to buy the revised version.
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Post by Guest »

Hi all,

Thought I'd bump this thread. With Xmas 2007 just round the corner has anyone got any new books for beginners? I just want to get to grips with some of the basics (ISO, etc) but would like a book with a slant towards digital photography.

Found this nice article online by the way called "Bernie's Better Beginner's Guide to Photography for Computer Geeks Who Want to be Digital Artists":
http://www.berniecode.com/writing/photography/beginners/

T
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Post by Boink! »

I was bought the John Hedgecoe book years ago when it was just "The Manual of Photography" and there was not even an inkling of the idea of digital.
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Post by dustjunkie »

timmustill wrote:Hi all,

Thought I'd bump this thread. With Xmas 2007 just round the corner has anyone got any new books for beginners? I just want to get to grips with some of the basics (ISO, etc) but would like a book with a slant towards digital photography.

Found this nice article online by the way called "Bernie's Better Beginner's Guide to Photography for Computer Geeks Who Want to be Digital Artists":
http://www.berniecode.com/writing/photography/beginners/

T


I started a C&G Level 2 Photography course at the begining of Oct and we were recomended 'Langford's Starting Photography' by Michael Langford as a good all round starters book.
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Post by Guest 10135 »

I am a total newbie to the whole camera world. Other than having a digital camera for taking all the usual photos, birthdays, nights out etc but I quite fancy learning what makes a good picture, what I should be looking for etc. Can anyone recommend me a very good beginners book?

Also, I am starting to look at getting a decent camera, what would people recommend for what I am trying to do, looking at spending about £250
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Post by Guest 53 »

Has anbody had a look at Understanding RAW Photography by Andy Rouse? I'm looking for an easy intro to RAW for my Dad and wondered if this was a good intro. Most of the books on RAW I've seen have been a bit too technical and concerned with the software rather than the benefits of RAW and the generic workflow process.

ickleyoda - As this is a book thread maybe start a new thread about which camera might get you more replies. Might be worth trying the search function as well as there's been a fair few threads on 'which camera?'
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Post by Guest 10135 »

Sam wrote:ickleyoda - As this is a book thread maybe start a new thread about which camera might get you more replies. Might be worth trying the search function as well as there's been a fair few threads on 'which camera?'


Cheers Sam, I will do that :thumbs:
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Post by Guest »

dustjunkie wrote:I started a C&G Level 2 Photography course at the begining of Oct and we were recomended 'Langford's Starting Photography' by Michael Langford as a good all round starters book.
Cheers, I'll have a look at Langford's Starting Photography.
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Post by ChrisBlack »

Christophe Agou's Life Below arrived from Amazon today. Wonderful little book. Its very well presented and there is only minimal prose, but the images inside are fantastic, especially for anyone who has an interest in street photography. I can imagine in the years that Agou compiled the images for this book, he must have shot hundreds, if not thousands of photographs. The selection is fantastic though - some wonderfully emotive and dark pictures - showing what extraordinary things you can see on the subway (and indeed anywhere) if you look for a protracted period of time.
All shot on an M6 with only a couple of wide lenses. I'm feeling I need to scratch an itch. Again :lol:
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Post by Guest 26778 »

I need to dig out my dissertation, I read loads of great books on conflict photography for my dissertation... currently reading Underexposed - Pictures can lie, and liars use pictures, which is all about the various issues around our understanding of photographs as records of fact.
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