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Old 02-09-2005, 07:02   #41
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As a combination of "representative film by key director" and "off the beaten track", I'd add the following. All are pre-80 and exist in a director-approved form somewhere in the world:

Bruce Beresford - Don's Party (tough one this - you could argue it's as much David Williamson as Beresford)
Robert Bresson - Pickpocket
Sergei Eisenstein - Battleship Potemkin
Tim Burstall - Petersen
David Lynch - Eraserhead
Yasujiro Ozu - Tokyo Story
Eric Rohmer - Love in the Afternoon
Jacques Tourneur - Night of the Demon
Peter Weir - Picnic at Hanging Rock
Robert Wise - The Curse of the Cat People (slight cheat, as it's not out until October)


would have liked to include the following:

Max Ophuls - but the only DVD seems to be Fox Lorber's none-too-good version of Lola Montes (and it's not in the version the director approved, which has since been restored) - I'd have named Letter from an Unknown Woman if it were available
Fred Schepisi - neither of his two pre-80 features are available on DVD as far as I know
Dusan Makavejev - WR: Mysteries of the Organism not available
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Old 02-09-2005, 08:24   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiting
"critical viewing matter" as in good or bad films ? Shirley both, after all, how else do you set your reference points...

...or is this deemed thread hijacking ?
Quite hard to define but I suppose I was thinking about Movies that made you glad you watched them. Movies that you would not have wanted to miss out on. As this is the Classic Cinema/DVD forum I think it would be sensible to only mention those that you personally deemed as classic in the 'good' sense.

In short Turkeys are out.

If I ever get time I'd love to combine all of your suggested titles into one ordered list.

Thanks for suggestions so far.
Im planning on sticking the movie titles I have nto seen yet into my favourite programmes on the radio times website to get reminded if they get an airing on any of my channels.

cheers dudes

mojo

mojo
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Old 02-09-2005, 08:45   #43
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Interesting thread this - bit more discussion than the usual huge lists...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
In what sense is Werner Herzog 'less well known' ?

Anyway, I'll take up the challenge and provide one representative film for each director on my list. My yardsticks are: pre-1980; available in a version which the director personally approved; sufficiently personal to contain the filmmaker's customary style and concerns.

Alfred Hitchcock - Vertigo
Mike,

Can I take ever such a gentle issue with these Vertigo? For me, although brilliant, is a very cold film. It lacks a lot of the wit and warmth of character nearly always found in Hitch's films. My suggestion would have been Rear Window or The Lady Vanishes.....
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Old 02-09-2005, 08:51   #44
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The last thing Vertigo is is cold - paraphiliac, sure, but it's not devoid of passion... or pathos.
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Old 02-09-2005, 09:04   #45
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dictionary.com is never far away when replying to your posts, Anephric..

Anyway, you think? Isn't it more obssessive than passionate? I find Scotty's complete lack of consideration for Madeline's feelings make it more detached; hence my feeling of it lacking warmth..

Still, not wanting to hijack a good thread...loads here I've never seen to take a look at.

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Old 02-09-2005, 09:08   #46
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As I see it, "Vertigo" is a terrifying, disturbing and overwhelmingly moving insight into Hitchcock's soul; as deep as we ever got in there, although "Marnie" comes close. It's the one film which brings together everything which makes Hitchcock one of the great directors. It's not my favourite Hitchcock film - that would be "Notorious" - but I think it's his best piece of filmmaking.

It's technically brilliant - with all Hitch's 'team' on top form - and full of suspense and character. I think the relationship between Jimmy Stewart and Barbara Bel Geddes has considerable warmth and pathos. There's also quintessential black comedy in Hitchcock's realisation that Jimmy Stewart - Mr American Everyman - was just perfect to play an obsessive deviant. Having done this, Hitch proceeds to view him with generosity and emotional understanding. The ending leaves me devastated and exhausted, even though I've seen it a million times.
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Old 02-09-2005, 09:19   #47
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Hmmm, good post that, Mike. As I was typing some of the above, I realised I had forgotten about the scenes with Bel Geddes - Stewart using the stool to test his Vertigo is a good example of levity in the film, I guess. I think I've probably fallen into the trap of quoting my favorite Hitch films, rather than wearing a properly critical hat....

One film per director aside, do you think Rear Window earns a mention based on the original theme of this thread..? (Go on, say it does - one of my absolute favorites.. )
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Old 02-09-2005, 09:24   #48
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May I suggest 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die. Its not a bad book at all, and has some wonderful stills in it. Contains many of the films detailed already on this thread. Definetly worth a read-and introduced me to a few fantastic films I had not seen

Best of all, its only Ł10 at BOL
The RRP is Ł25 so its a stonking bargain.


Downside-The spine picture is of CZJ in Chicago

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Old 02-09-2005, 09:26   #49
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Oh definitely yes. I think - having raised the idea myself - that the one film idea isn't entirely adequate for some filmmakers. For Hitchcock I think you'd have to add "Rear Window", "Psycho", "Strangers on a Train", "Notorious", "Lady Vanishes", "Marnie" etc etc.
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Old 02-09-2005, 11:03   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
Oh definitely yes. I think - having raised the idea myself - that the one film idea isn't entirely adequate for some filmmakers. For Hitchcock I think you'd have to add "Rear Window", "Psycho", "Strangers on a Train", "Notorious", "Lady Vanishes", "Marnie" etc etc.
There are very few 'perfect' films around; films where there isn't a scene, a line, a shot isn't quite on the money (and the very definition of perfection is subjective), but for me you can put Vertigo right in there. The final shot still leaves me feeling elated and drained at the same time. Even in 'lesser' Hitch - Torn Curtain for instance - there is material which is 'must see'. It's fascinating the way he chased the narrative themes of The 39 Steps right through his career; from Donat and Carroll to Saboteur, Foreign Correspondent, honing and perfecting until we hit the apogee, North by Northwest.

I couldn't define Ford with one film; the cavalry trilogy might seem 'typical' but they explore different themes on the same plane, and just when everyone thought they had the old guy worked out he came up with something so subtlely subversive (The Searchers, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance) that it's taken a generation or so for them to be truly appreciated.

What you can do, with relative certainty, is compile a list of 'must see' directors (Mike's already done an excellent list), where most of their work is worth watching, and even the failures are interesting in the context of their CVs.

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Old 02-09-2005, 11:21   #51
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John Ford is another huge gap in my film education (starts and stops with the Searchers)....

However, all the above has put me right in the mood for watching Vertigo! It must be about 3 years since I've watched it last.

Think tonight is time to dust off the old laserdisc, and admire the lovely gatefold sleeve....
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Old 02-09-2005, 12:29   #52
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If I were to pick a Ford, it'd be The Quiet Man, because it's representative of him and his themes in so many ways, yet atypical...

So it could hardly be be called "definitive" or perfect, but yet you can see the personality shining forth from it in every frame...
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Old 02-09-2005, 13:07   #53
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You know what? This thread is heading into a cul-de-sac (A Pole, 1966) which is where all lists lead eventually. That's why I, personally, never ever make them, except when I go shopping. Lists are essentially a waste of time - the guy who started this thread wanted to know which are the critical essential movies he should see and what followed has been a blitzkrieg of personal idiosyncracy, wilful buffi-ness, plain stupidity and . . . I'll stop now as it looks like a list. In 20 pages or so this thread will probably have mentioned ever film ever made, except possibly The Magus.
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Old 02-09-2005, 13:10   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hodson

What you can do, with relative certainty, is compile a list of 'must see' directors (Mike's already done an excellent list), where most of their work is worth watching, and even the failures are interesting in the context of their CVs.
could you get me the link to the said list please Mike/John??
cheers
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Old 02-09-2005, 13:40   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo Risin
could you get me the link to the said list please Mike/John??
cheers
I was referring to Mike's list in post #29 on the previous page, MR; Gary's list in post #41 on this page is also a cracker.
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Old 02-09-2005, 13:49   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Armbruster
You know what? This thread is heading into a cul-de-sac (A Pole, 1966) which is where all lists lead eventually. That's why I, personally, never ever make them, except when I go shopping. Lists are essentially a waste of time - the guy who started this thread wanted to know which are the critical essential movies he should see and what followed has been a blitzkrieg of personal idiosyncracy, wilful buffi-ness, plain stupidity and . . . I'll stop now as it looks like a list. In 20 pages or so this thread will probably have mentioned ever film ever made, except possibly The Magus.
Lists are indeed, for the most part, a waste of space; I cannot argue with that (indeed I've postulated that theory many a time myself).

But the OP wanted a little help, and as this Forum would become itself a waste of (cyber)space unless some folks were willing to extend a hand to those that ask for it I don't see anything wrong in 'a blitzkrieg of personal idiosyncracy, wilful buffi-ness and plain stupidity'. That is, unless you're a curmudgeonly old git who wouldn't spit on someone who was on fire - you're not, are you WA? Tell me it ain't so, oh friend of the stars...I seem to recall that you've been unafraid to pass on an opinion or two, to let some small drips of knowledge fall from the tap of wisdom.

Do it now; be a mensch.

Yours

A. Wilful Buff, Iness, UK

EDIT - forgot to mention another unmissable - The Magus. Fab Michael Caine film.

Last edited by John Hodson; 02-09-2005 at 13:57.
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Old 02-09-2005, 14:05   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Armbruster
blah blah blah
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Old 02-09-2005, 19:17   #58
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Originally Posted by John Hodson
Do it now; be a mensch.
Oh Mildred! He's at it again!
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Old 13-09-2005, 13:10   #59
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managed to find this list http://www.hazabaza.co.uk/lists/1001.htm
its the movies featured in steven jay schneiders book 1001 movies you have to see before you die.
well over 2 months viewing pleasure!
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Old 13-09-2005, 13:54   #60
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If I've got to watch Braveheart, Chicago, Titanic or Meet the Parents again before I pop my clogs, then take me now, dear Lord, take me now...
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