Go Back   Forums @ The Digital Fix > Entertainment Discussion Forums > Film Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-02-2006, 17:52   #41
anephric
Kidney Thief
 
anephric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Derby, UK
Posts: 22,698
Thanks: 33
Thanked 120 Times in 76 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hodson

Nixon; I've never seen Nixon - I want to, but I want to see an anamorphic transfer and I want a commentary. Not much to ask.

It'll never happen - I waited so long and got utterly sick of my VHS. It's unlikely to be revisited this side of Hi-def, non? Simply because it'll sell about 27 copies.

Buy it. Buy the extended R1. It's about $1.76, isn't it?
__________________
www.khaaan.com
anephric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 18:03   #42
John Hodson
Out to lunch...
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Bolton, Lancashire
Posts: 12,507
Thanks: 9
Thanked 55 Times in 4 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by anephric
Buy it. Buy the extended R1. It's about $1.76, isn't it?
Ł5-odd, but I take your point.

While I'm here I'll shamefacedly admit to never having seen Cronenberg's Spider or Crash. So many films...

Last edited by John Hodson; 02-02-2006 at 20:50. Reason: spelyng
John Hodson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 18:22   #43
Jungle Ted
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Crawley Down
Posts: 873
Thanks: 44
Thanked 11 Times in 4 Posts
Bridge over the River Kwai
Citizen Kane
Brazil
Lawrence of Arabia

I have these on DVD but still haven't seen them yet, guess I should have made the most of a month's garden leave instead of lying in every day.
Jungle Ted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 20:55   #44
Guest 849
Blimey I'm a dad!
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Your fevered imagination !
Posts: 2,945
Thanks: 29
Thanked 11 Times in 9 Posts
I've had the Deer Hunter on DVD for ages, it never seems the right time to watch it
Guest 849 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 21:04   #45
anephric
Kidney Thief
 
anephric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Derby, UK
Posts: 22,698
Thanks: 33
Thanked 120 Times in 76 Posts
Try starving yourself; it keeps the fear up.
anephric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 23:37   #46
Guest 30302
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 3,067
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Big Mommas House.
Guest 30302 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 23:53   #47
marc_angelus
Trusted User
 
marc_angelus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,036
Thanks: 14
Thanked 43 Times in 33 Posts
believe it or not i've also never seen the godfather trilogy.. there's also a lot of other top imdb films i haven't seen but the godfather trilogy are the only ones i would contemplate watching, just never got round to it.. have the R1 dvd boxset, so it'll happen one day..

Last edited by marc_angelus; 02-02-2006 at 23:57.
marc_angelus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 01:08   #48
SqueakyG
Trusted User
 
SqueakyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 3,268
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
What's the point of doing a film degree when you don't like films?
To be completely honest, the point was to stay in the education system as long as possible before having to go out into the real world. The subject I chose just happened to be something I found easy and pleasant. I never had any intention of getting a job in film-making or the media.

But I do like film. Just not in an artsy-fartsy intellectual way - but then again, the University of Central Lancashire was far from an artsy-fartsy university.

There are plenty of "classics" I have seen and liked, and plenty more that I wrote huge essays about. I don't think my list of "haven't seens" and "didn't likes" was that shocking - mostly westerns, historical epics and Asian cinema - not my favourite types, so I'll have a hard time watching slow-paced weighty examples of them.

Last edited by SqueakyG; 03-02-2006 at 01:11.
SqueakyG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 02:44   #49
Guest 12896
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,386
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If I'm being honest I got a bit bored watching Seven Samurai - then again I do watch a LOT of stuff so my patience isnt as good as it used to be when I first started collecting DVDs

I kept trying to tell myself this was one of the highest rated films of all time but it didnt help much

Personally I enjoyed the "faster paced" Yojimbo a lot more

Its the same with a lot of the slower paced arthouse stuff - I used to really love watching them but not so much anymore
Guest 12896 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 06:49   #50
Guest 24565
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Plymouth, UK
Posts: 577
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Despite buying the boxset about 4 years ago I still haven't seen any of the Godfather films.
Guest 24565 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 11:42   #51
Jonnof
another man's pretentious
 
Jonnof's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 2,193
Thanks: 21
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I think it gets worse as you get older. I first saw many of my favourites - Casablanca, North By Northwest, 2001, Lawrence of Arabia, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers(!) - in my pre-teens, not knowing (or caring) about their classic status… they were just good films.

Reputations can easily eclipse the films themselves... I know I've found it either offputting or baffling at times, but the main point of nearly every film mentioned on this thread is to entertain - a point easily forgotten when they're so weighed down with prestige.

The main reason for watching Vertigo should be that it’s a great film, not men with beards telling you how important it is
Jonnof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2006, 14:04   #52
Guest 55458
HYBRID
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 143
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
CITIZEN KANE
CASABLANCA
ON the WATERFRONT

got them on dvd..never got round to watch them...
Guest 55458 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2006, 15:32   #53
anephric
Kidney Thief
 
anephric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Derby, UK
Posts: 22,698
Thanks: 33
Thanked 120 Times in 76 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonnof

The main reason for watching Vertigo should be that it’s a great film, not men with beards telling you how important it is
Film academia and being told that you have to "distance" yourself from a classical narrative, for example, taking notes and such and avoiding being sucked too completely into it (when the whole idea of Hollywood classical narrative is the opposite) is a little depressing, I agree. When we had screenings on my degree course, for example, the house lights were kept on partially so that we could discern our fevered scribblings during the film, which was a trifle unpleasant (for me, anyhow). I just wanted to watch the things (maybe I shouldn't have done Film Theory).
__________________
www.khaaan.com
anephric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2006, 16:51   #54
Guest 29
Last Of The Independents
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Up North
Posts: 5,668
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I can't for the life of me understand the point of Film Studies as an academic discipline when - in my experience - most of the people who do it seem dead-set against admiring or even being mildly enthusiastic about wonderful, vastly influential films because they're either boring or too slow or black and white or 'not relevant'. It's a bit like someone doing Italian history and wondering why they have to study the boring, irrelevant old Renaissance. If you're going to do Film then doesn't it make sense to do it with a passion and devour anything and everything on celluloid (like I suspect Anephric did) from Melies to Tarantino and all points in-between.
Guest 29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2006, 18:58   #55
SqueakyG
Trusted User
 
SqueakyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 3,268
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by anephric
Film academia and being told that you have to "distance" yourself from a classical narrative, for example, taking notes and such and avoiding being sucked too completely into it
That wasn't my experience. I certainly learned how film manipulates the audience to be enthused, entertained, etc. I suppose it gives a person new understandings of what they are watching. You'd imagine it might spoil your ability to enjoy a film, when you know how it is constructed to get the intended reactions from you.

But I never distanced myself from being entertained. (I never took notes during screenings either... maybe my university was more rubbish than I thought...)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
I can't for the life of me understand the point of Film Studies as an academic discipline when - in my experience - most of the people who do it seem dead-set against admiring or even being mildly enthusiastic about wonderful, vastly influential films because they're either boring or too slow or black and white or 'not relevant'. If you're going to do Film then doesn't it make sense to do it with a passion
Hmm. I understand that experience with English - any book that you're made to study at A-level English automatically becomes boring and unwelcome, because the focus of academia turns it into a chore rather than a pleasure. I didn't quite have that experience with film studies though - I was enthusiastic about nearly everything I studied.

It's true that most people on my course - including myself to some degree - didn't choose film and media studies due to passion for the subject, but just to get a degree. However, it's unfair for you to suggest they weren't enthusiastic or interested in the subject matter. It's true, not many of them worked hard, and it was a fairly poor university that didn't push us hard anyway. But I think we all loved film.

As for films that are "boring or too slow or black and white": I think there are valid arguments about why modern audiences find it hard to watch old films. When Technicolor first appeared, there were lots of people who thought films looked "unrealistic" in colour, because they associated black and white so intrinsically with moving pictures. People born in modern times can arguably say that black and white is unrealistic and visually uninteresting. As for "slow and boring", again, modern audiences have become used to much faster editing and a camera that never stays still.

None of those things put me off old films - I wouldn't have been able to do a film degree at all if those things out me off. There are plenty of "classics" I have watched and enjoyed, and plenty more that I didn't exactly enjoy but I learned some fundamentals of filmmaking.

Not all films made over the past 100+ years were made to be enjoyed. I've seen some art-house experimental stuff that was purposely made to test the audience's patience. Some film movements are only relevant to their particular culture at a particular time in history. Most old films become less understandable when watched in a different era or culture than they were made for. Not to mention the sheer concept of "opinion" - even most classics got some bad reviews! When I had academic interest to push me, none of these things were a problem - in fact they are interesting concepts in themselves.

But today, without academic interest to push me, I've got the sense to turn something off if I just can't get through it, for the above reasons. I don't want to feel ashamed about that. Don't make me.

Last edited by SqueakyG; 04-02-2006 at 19:16.
SqueakyG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 00:18   #56
anephric
Kidney Thief
 
anephric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Derby, UK
Posts: 22,698
Thanks: 33
Thanked 120 Times in 76 Posts
My course was bursting to the seams full of wasters, and I don't pretend to be the most cineastic fella on the planet. That said, I quite happily snuck into screenings for other courses (Practical Film, for example) because they got to watch things that we didn't (a lot of animation, more avant garde fare).

We got moaned at to take notes because, duh-dun-duuuh, many people were kicking their feet up and enjoying the films and were not able to contribute much to the seminars, post-screening. There was a distinct lack of enthusiasm from the majority of people to volunteer opinions in front of 50 or so peers to a seasoned film lecturer who more often than not would dissect your inchoate little theory into a thousand flayed little pieces. You don't want to know what happened when I suggested that the opening shots of Citizen Kane, with the camera creeping ever closer through the decrepit Xanadu and Kane's ultimate utterance, might be representative of fate or "death" approaching. And when I suggested that Ophuls' Letter from an Unknown Woman carried all the emotional subtlety of a Geordie roadcrew with a pneumatic drill, I was publically disembowelled for being a heathen boor.

Last edited by anephric; 05-02-2006 at 00:22.
anephric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 08:47   #57
Guest 155
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Aldershot, Hampshire
Posts: 1,538
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by SqueakyG
Hmm. I understand that experience with English - any book that you're made to study at A-level English automatically becomes boring and unwelcome, because the focus of academia turns it into a chore rather than a pleasure.
I did A-level English in a year and had the opposite experience. Maybe I was lucky in that I had two excellent teachers who made the subject interesting (and that applies even to T.S. Eliot's poetry, which is demanding by any standard). Another factor may be that - for reasons I won't go into because they're not relevant here - I specifically chose to do English rather than than settling into a subject I "could" do. I went on to read English at University, and twenty years later I still read a variety of fiction, for pleasure.



As for films that are "boring or too slow or black and white": I think there are valid arguments about why modern audiences find it hard to watch old films. When Technicolor first appeared, there were lots of people who thought films looked "unrealistic" in colour, because they associated black and white so intrinsically with moving pictures.

I'm too young (41) to remember when you could regularly see b/w films in cinemas, though I can remember when they still could be played on primetime TV channels. There's a technical issue involved too - back in the 60s, black and white stock was more "realistic" because it was more sensitive and you could shoot in something approaching natural light. (That's a reason why Frederick Wiseman shot most of his documentaries in black and white 16mm.) Colour stock then needed much more lighting - and people tended to emphasise bright colours when they used it - which meant that people tended to associate it with historical epics and musicals rather than low-key realism. Nowadays, colour film has progressed to the point where if you can see it, you can film it, more or less.

People born in modern times can arguably say that black and white is unrealistic and visually uninteresting. As for "slow and boring", again, modern audiences have become used to much faster editing and a camera that never stays still.

So what? Colour is not necessarily realistic, and why should films have to be "realistic" anyway?

As for "visually uninteresting", well, if a new film comes out in black and white then I'm immediately interested, because it means that the makers have thought about their film's visual aspects. That's one reason why I'm looking forward to Good Morning and Good Luck - other reasons being that it sounds like it's a good film.

That doesn't mean that all recent b/w films are good. I don't know why Kenneth Branagh shot In the Bleak Midwinter that way: it didn't really suit the subject and just seemed pretentious. Prince's Under the Cherry Moon is just dire.

Too many films are simply in colour rather than using colour in any creative way.

As for pacing, Jim Jarmusch is a "modern" director. So, for that matter, is Clint Eastwood, who makes his films in a very classical manner. I don't see audiences having a problem with that if the end result is good.

Some film movements are only relevant to their particular culture at a particular time in history. Most old films become less understandable when watched in a different era or culture than they were made for.

Which film movements do you have in mind?

If "identifiablity" is the be-all-and-end-all, then why do we as Brits watch predominantly American films? They are products of a foreign country and culture after all. Does it mean, as Wim Wenders said, that the Americans have colonised our subconscious? In fact, I've heard many Brits look down on British films. That's not a uniquely British cultural cringe: few people are harder on Australian films than the Aussies. I'm no more Australian than the many fans of Asian films are Japanese, Thai, Chinese or Korean, but I've learned a lot more than I would have done otherwise about a country I've yet to visit. I've watched several Iranian films, and the same goes there. I can watch French, German, Greek, Brazilian films...all products of foreign cultures. No doubt there are plenty of local references that go over my head, but the films still work for me.
Guest 155 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 19:44   #58
jaminblack
Escaped Gorilla
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 449
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
what a cool thread from a simple idea.

I've seen the Godfather twice. but fell asleep the first time,
so made a point to Try and watch it again and succeeded.
I didn't enjoy it and can't see what all the fuss was about.
This has meant I've avoided the followups.

I've also 'meant' to watch Any Kurosawa flick but failed.

I'm a big Anime fan, but, I've not seen Grave of the Fireflies.

ps. I've not seen Stealth (see Underworld evolution thread).

Last edited by jaminblack; 05-02-2006 at 19:47.
jaminblack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 19:56   #59
GodBlessTheUSA
The Red, White And Blue!
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 544
Thanks: 3
Thanked 12 Times in 8 Posts
I had never seen any of the Godfather films, Once upon a time in America, Scarface, or Carlitos Way and at work a few days ago people were talking about them, I felt so left out so I bought them all on Friday and had a weekend of watching them all!!!

My brain hurts but now i'm a tiny bit happier knowing I don't have to lie anymore...
GodBlessTheUSA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 20:01   #60
Guest 52145
Big Damn Hero
 
Guest 52145's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 1,877
Thanks: 8
Thanked 9 Times in 3 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by GodBlessTheUSA
I had never seen any of the Godfather films, Once upon a time in America, Scarface, or Carlitos Way and at work a few days ago people were talking about them, I felt so left out so I bought them all on Friday and had a weekend of watching them all!!!

My brain hurts but now i'm a tiny bit happier knowing I don't have to lie anymore...
And what did you think of them?
Guest 52145 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
2001: A Space Odyssey, Casablanca, Citizen Kane, Crash, Dances with Wolves, Great Films, Schindlers List, The Aviator, The Deer Hunter, The Godfather

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:15.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.qq
Copyright ©2000 - 2021 Network N Ltd.