Go Back   Forums @ The Digital Fix > Entertainment Discussion Forums > Film Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 13-06-2007, 18:15   #41
Guest 58501
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 176
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The 70s are my favorite era in film, by some margin, such an interesting period of time. Sticking to Hollywood, and it's a pretty long list, I'd say my absolute favorites are:

3 Days of the Condor
3 Women
McCabe & Mrs. Miller
Nashville
Long Goodbye
An Unmarried Woman
Blume in Love
Harry and Tonto
Straight Time
Chinatown
Klute
The Godfather
The Warriors
Manhattan
Annie Hall
Last Picture Show
Shampoo
Mean Streets
The Last Detail
Carrie
Smile
Scarecrow
Badlands
Born to Win

As well as more obviously flawed films I still love - Semi Tough, Prime Cut, Eyes of Laura Mars (hey...I'll defend this as a top notch bit of pure cinema and toshy thriller any time I have to), Sisters, Cisco Pike, Up the Sandbox...
Guest 58501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2007, 19:11   #42
Guest 15513
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Falkirk
Posts: 2,234
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtanner View Post
The 70s are my favorite era in film, by some margin, such an interesting period of time. Sticking to Hollywood, and it's a pretty long list, I'd say my absolute favorites are:

3 Days of the Condor
3 Women
McCabe & Mrs. Miller
Nashville
Long Goodbye
An Unmarried Woman
Blume in Love
Harry and Tonto
Straight Time
Chinatown
Klute
The Godfather
The Warriors
Manhattan
Annie Hall
Last Picture Show
Shampoo
Mean Streets
The Last Detail
Carrie
Smile
Scarecrow
Badlands
Born to Win

As well as more obviously flawed films I still love - Semi Tough, Prime Cut, Eyes of Laura Mars (hey...I'll defend this as a top notch bit of pure cinema and toshy thriller any time I have to), Sisters, Cisco Pike, Up the Sandbox...

A great list - one ommission - The parallax View

plus perhaps All the presidents men.

In general for any fans of this era - go see Zodiac. It recreates the time period very convincingly.

Last edited by stefmcd; 13-06-2007 at 19:12.
Guest 15513 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-06-2007, 20:34   #43
Guest 61452
Trusted User
 
Guest 61452's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 919
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtanner View Post
The 70s are my favorite era in film, by some margin, such an interesting period of time. Sticking to Hollywood, and it's a pretty long list, I'd say my absolute favorites are:

3 Days of the Condor
3 Women
McCabe & Mrs. Miller
Nashville
Long Goodbye
An Unmarried Woman
Blume in Love
Harry and Tonto
Straight Time
Chinatown
Klute
The Godfather
The Warriors
Manhattan
Annie Hall
Last Picture Show
Shampoo
Mean Streets
The Last Detail
Carrie
Smile
Scarecrow
Badlands
Born to Win

As well as more obviously flawed films I still love - Semi Tough, Prime Cut, Eyes of Laura Mars (hey...I'll defend this as a top notch bit of pure cinema and toshy thriller any time I have to), Sisters, Cisco Pike, Up the Sandbox...
Great list! But no Fingers (easily Toback's best film)?
Guest 61452 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 08:17   #44
Guest 58501
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 176
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Funny you should mention that - I've been meaning to order Fingers over the past few days! I've not seen it yet.

Quote:
A great list - one ommission - The parallax View
Yes, probably did forget that one (also Don't Look Now is another one I overlooked).

Last edited by Mtanner; 14-06-2007 at 08:17.
Guest 58501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 10:02   #45
TheDot
Space Monkey
 
TheDot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,778
Thanks: 40
Thanked 122 Times in 24 Posts
Id certainly include Taxi Driver and All the Presidents Men in that list, two of my favorite films.

I do love watching some 70's classics and have noticed that there are still plenty I need to check out, I shall be tracking down a few from Mtanners list.

Last edited by TheDot; 05-01-2010 at 21:20.
TheDot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 10:07   #46
DanWilde1966
I no longer post here.
 
DanWilde1966's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,006
Thanks: 28
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
I think that Jaws is one of the key films of the 70s, as well as being one of my favourites. From the point of view of film craft, it's a remarkable piece of work. It rips off Hitchcock for sure, but considering that Hitch helped define so much of Hollywood genre film grammar, this is hardly a criticism! Jaws is a piece of textbook "high concept" filmmaking, but it also revolutionised the way films are released and marketed: the saturation-release and full-blown TV campaign, were unusual for the time. I don't care that Spielberg, given his time again, would do the film somewhat differently. The movie is his masterpiece, in my view, with a minimum of his trademark schmaltz, and with the suspense and character-interaction thrust centre-stage.
DanWilde1966 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 10:53   #47
Alan George
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2,216
Thanks: 1
Thanked 74 Times in 48 Posts
Historical - The Last Valley
Western - Duck you Sucker!
War - Cross Of Iron
Thriller - Assault On Precinct 13
Comedy - Start The Revolution Without Me
Musical - The Phantom Of The Paradise
Monster - King Kong (well I liked it!)
S.F. - Time After Time
Adventure The Man Who Would Be King
Horror - Dawn Of The Dead

And about 250 others, but I prefer the 60s.
Alan George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 11:17   #48
Guest 15513
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Falkirk
Posts: 2,234
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanWilde1966 View Post
I think that Jaws is one of the key films of the 70s, as well as being one of my favourites. From the point of view of film craft, it's a remarkable piece of work. It rips off Hitchcock for sure, but considering that Hitch helped define so much of Hollywood genre film grammar, this is hardly a criticism! Jaws is a piece of textbook "high concept" filmmaking, but it also revolutionised the way films are released and marketed: the saturation-release and full-blown TV campaign, were unusual for the time. I don't care that Spielberg, given his time again, would do the film somewhat differently. The movie is his masterpiece, in my view, with a minimum of his trademark schmaltz, and with the suspense and character-interaction thrust centre-stage.

'Jaws' is quite fascinating. Very much a double-edged sword. Possibly the culmination of the era in terms of entertainment but it signalled the beginning of the studios autocratic, slavishly formulaic approach to the industry.

No denying it is a great film but its influence was more negative than positive.
Guest 15513 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 11:23   #49
Guest 61452
Trusted User
 
Guest 61452's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 919
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanWilde1966 View Post
I think that Jaws is one of the key films of the 70s, as well as being one of my favourites. From the point of view of film craft, it's a remarkable piece of work. It rips off Hitchcock for sure, but considering that Hitch helped define so much of Hollywood genre film grammar, this is hardly a criticism! Jaws is a piece of textbook "high concept" filmmaking, but it also revolutionised the way films are released and marketed: the saturation-release and full-blown TV campaign, were unusual for the time. I don't care that Spielberg, given his time again, would do the film somewhat differently. The movie is his masterpiece, in my view, with a minimum of his trademark schmaltz, and with the suspense and character-interaction thrust centre-stage.
Couldn't agree more - Jaws is my all time favourite film, I still watch it at least 2-3 times a year. Speilberg has certainly made "worthier" films but it's almost like he peaked in his late 20s.
Guest 61452 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 12:33   #50
DanWilde1966
I no longer post here.
 
DanWilde1966's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,006
Thanks: 28
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by stefmcd View Post
No denying it is a great film but its influence was more negative than positive.
I guess it was one of the first generation of films which showed studios that one film could bring in over $100 million. The blockbuster became the summer commercial ideal, which generally meant 16-25 yr old-oriented product. Haven't the studios always been slavishly formulaic, though? There was a sudden flush of auteurism is the late 60s and early 70s (Altman, Pakula, Coppola, Scorsese, et al), but they came at the back end of a Hollywood that was making films like The Sound of Music. No director works outside of basic economics, or in total ignorance or denial of what will sell. Despite the "Movie Brats", didn't people like Altman continue to do their stuff (with Short Cuts being one of my favourite films from recent decades)?
DanWilde1966 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 14:00   #51
Guest 15513
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Falkirk
Posts: 2,234
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanWilde1966 View Post
I guess it was one of the first generation of films which showed studios that one film could bring in over $100 million. The blockbuster became the summer commercial ideal, which generally meant 16-25 yr old-oriented product. Haven't the studios always been slavishly formulaic, though? There was a sudden flush of auteurism is the late 60s and early 70s (Altman, Pakula, Coppola, Scorsese, et al), but they came at the back end of a Hollywood that was making films like The Sound of Music. No director works outside of basic economics, or in total ignorance or denial of what will sell. Despite the "Movie Brats", didn't people like Altman continue to do their stuff (with Short Cuts being one of my favourite films from recent decades)?

I think ur right about studios always following formula up to a point but the blockbuster era, which many would see as a reaction to the quieter low-key films of the Rafelson-Altman- Bogdanovitch period, meant budgets sky-rocketed and studios refused to take chances. This is IMO why the 80s was such a stagnant period for anything other than popcorn movies.

While I love Jaws I prefer Duel for its less extravagant approach but equally gripping effect.
Guest 15513 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 14:09   #52
DanWilde1966
I no longer post here.
 
DanWilde1966's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,006
Thanks: 28
Thanked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by stefmcd View Post
While I love Jaws I prefer Duel for its less extravagant approach but equally gripping effect.
I think Duel's a flawed movie, in the sense that famously, it cuts away inexplicably from David Mann's point of view in one scene, and for some reason, it doesn't seem to repay multiple viewings. I showed it to a bunch of students recently, and I was surprised by how bored I was with it. Jaws, as you said earlier, is fascinating and can be seen endlessly.
DanWilde1966 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 14:32   #53
Guest 58501
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 176
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanWilde1966 View Post
Despite the "Movie Brats", didn't people like Altman continue to do their stuff (with Short Cuts being one of my favourite films from recent decades)?
He certainly did, although there's a big gap in the 80s where he was making films like Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean where the change in budget is very clear and HealtH which was put on the shelf by the studio for some time (although perhaps it's clear why!).

The one person who I don't think has ever been troubled by finances from the 70s up to now is Woody Allen, who (I think) gets private funding for everything. His movies don't make much of a profit but there's minimal interference.

I find it interesting that it wasn't just the directors but the actors also who did not adapt well to the changes in the 80s. It was a while before even the big names did well, like Nicholson or Pacino and the women like Fonda and Dunaway and Christie fared even worse or gave up altogether. You can compare 80s dreck to 70s dreck in terms of the actual films, but I think acting by the top stars of the time was really at a high.
Guest 58501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 15:55   #54
Guest 56823
Trusted User
 
Guest 56823's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,174
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think one reason the 70's are my fave decade for films is because that's when I grew up and started to appreciate films.

The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith
3 Women
Close Encounters
Days of Heaven
A Woman Under the Influence
Tristana
Alien
Annie Hall
Eraserhead
Chinatown
The Tenant
New York New York
Don't Look Now
Harold and Maude
Young Frankenstein
Klute
Smile
Rabid Dogs
Day for Night
Prime Cut
Providence
Valerie and her Week of Wonders
All That Jazz
Fear Eats the Soul
Deep Red
Carrie
Guest 56823 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-06-2007, 16:07   #55
SIMON ADEBISI
****
 
SIMON ADEBISI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Luimneach, Eire
Posts: 40,977
Thanks: 486
Thanked 532 Times in 242 Posts
Dawn Of The Dead
Jaws
Suspiria
Lets Scare Jessica To Death
The Parallax View
Magnum Force ( always preferred this to the original )
The Outlaw Josie Wales.
One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
The Boys From Brazil
Freebie And The Bean.
SIMON ADEBISI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-06-2007, 17:13   #56
JoelCairo
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,123
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ryan's Daughter
The Getaway
Dirty Harry
The Shootist
Harry In Your Pocket
Hard Times (aka The Streetfighter)
The Driver
Emperor Of The North (aka Emperor Of The North Pole)
Twilight's Last Gleaming
Chinatown
Junior Bonner
The Last Run
Day Of The Jackal
Saint Jack
Conversation Piece
The Sting
Family Plot

Last edited by JoelCairo; 22-07-2007 at 09:45. Reason: Omission
JoelCairo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-06-2007, 11:41   #57
Raigmore
Ambassador to Earth
 
Raigmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: STILL David Vincent's neighbour
Posts: 8,100
Thanks: 422
Thanked 413 Times in 209 Posts
Although I hate the 70s as a decade, I admit some of my favourite movies came from it. Started with Airport (released in 1970), the granddaddy and one of the best of the 'disaster' cycle. Others include:

1. Tora! Tora!! Tora!!!
2. Ryan's Daughter
3. The Towering Inferno
4. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
5. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
6. Star Wars
7. Dirty Harry
8. Alien
9. The Sting


I am sure that there are many more that do not immediatly spring to mind. The 70s also had a good crop of low budget TV Movies that were predictable, but also quite watchable like Fire! with Ernest Borgnine.

There were other films which had either a great background story and good premise but suffered due to mediocre scripts. I include Black Sunday, The Poseidon Adventure and Capricorn One among them.
Raigmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-06-2007, 12:49   #58
Guest 56823
Trusted User
 
Guest 56823's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,174
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raigmore View Post
Although I hate the 70s as a decade.
Loved the 70's hated the 80's myself.
Guest 56823 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-06-2007, 15:45   #59
Raigmore
Ambassador to Earth
 
Raigmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: STILL David Vincent's neighbour
Posts: 8,100
Thanks: 422
Thanked 413 Times in 209 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Tomorrow View Post
Loved the 70's hated the 80's myself.
I guess it depends on one's age and personal experiences. I was a kid in the 60s and had a great time till 1967, which was a turning point for some reason. I disliked the general outlook in society from then on till the mid-90s after which things seem OK once again.
Raigmore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-06-2007, 17:46   #60
Guest 53667
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 129
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My favs from the '70s:
Cabaret
The Garden of the Finzi Continis
Sunday Bloody Sunday
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Picnic at Hanging Rock
Guest 53667 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
2001: A Space Odyssey, 70's, Blow Up, Bonnie & Clyde, Chinatown, Dawn of the Dead, Deliverance, Don't look now, Electra Glide In Blue, halloween, I Spit on your Grave, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Jaws, Little Big Man, Performance, Point Blank, Shivers, Suspiria, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Hills Have Eyes, The Last House On the Left, The Parallax View, The Wild Bunch, Ulzana's Raid, Zombi 2

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:57.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.qq
Copyright ©2000 - 2021 Network N Ltd.