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Old 02-03-2005, 23:00   #1
robbiez666
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Best films to watch foreign films?

I seem to only get emotionally involved with non-English films. I think they are vastly superior. The only English language films I really liked recently are Garden State, Sideways and Closer.
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Old 03-03-2005, 11:20   #2
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i watched Hero and Casshern recently both were really good.

although casshern takes a few watching's to really grasp the story.
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Old 03-03-2005, 12:43   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbiez666
I seem to only get emotionally involved with non-English films...
I always find the opposite is true. No matter how good or bad a foreign film is, there is always a barrier between me and the film: subtitles. I've enjoyed and admired many foreign language films but never get into them as much as those in English.
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Old 03-03-2005, 13:18   #4
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I think subtitled films have an advantage over ones that are in your native language; namely that you are unable to judge/criticize accents, delivery and timing and also that you never miss a word. Of course one can argue that this advantage is also a disadvantage, in that you can't pick up on speech subtleties nor let your mind wander as much.

I find people who have a super relaxed attitude to watching films, don't particularly get much from subtitled ones. I guess it's difficult to read, when you're eat a pizza or texting.
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Old 03-03-2005, 14:03   #5
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I watch different films at different times. I won't put on a subtitled film in the back-ground while doing something else, or when lying in bed to watch a film (foreign languages are too relaxing - makes me fall asleep).

However, when properly watching a film, foreign language films are my favourite. In the same way that I like opera in Italian, a foreign language almosts acts as a soundtrack to the film.

I guess the big choice is for a film like Aguirre, where English and German are avaliable, but both are dubs anyway. In that case I would go for German, because I wouldn't notice the lack of lip-synch.
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Old 03-03-2005, 14:08   #6
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maybe its because you have to concentrate on non-English films 9ie read the subs). After about 5 minutes I don't notice the subtitles at all 9unles they are wrong or on a poor background)
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Old 03-03-2005, 14:15   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R-T-C
I guess the big choice is for a film like Aguirre, where English and German are avaliable, but both are dubs anyway. In that case I would go for German, because I wouldn't notice the lack of lip-synch.
Good example! I caught both Aguirre and Fitzcarraldo on the big screen in German with English subtitles. However when I got the DVD I noticed that the English track on Fitzcarraldo was actually the one that the lip sync matched to, so I proceeded to watch that only to find the film not as half as interesting. I thought maybe it was because it was on my 32" WS TV and not the cinema, however on subsequent viewings I selected the German dub with English subtitles and fell in love with it again.
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Old 03-03-2005, 14:24   #8
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I find myself getting more emotionally involved with foreign films too. There have been a fair few Asian films in recent times to make me shed a tear or two (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Il Mare, House of Flying Daggers and Take Care of My Cat to name but a few), but I find English-language films rarely have that effect on me.
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Old 03-03-2005, 15:02   #9
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House of flying daggers brought a tear to your eye? You are weak!

Foreign language films that brought a tear to my eye would be "...Ing", which i've watched about 5 times, "Ju-On: The Grudge 1+2" because they were both bloody awful, "Kikansya Sensei" which was a wonderful movie. Didnt quite get into it at first but after a short while I couldnt switch it off, it was amazing! Both "My Sassy Girl" and "Windstruck" also done the job. Windstruck mainly because during the sad scenes it was playing one of my favourite X Japan songs. And even though its not a movie, X Japan's performance of Forever Love at their last concert "The Last Live". That brought more than one damn tear to my eye!

And I think people get more emotional with foreign films because when reading subtitles, you can think of it as ready a book.. and you use your imagination for how it would be said in english.. or something like that!

Oh, and I'd recommend any of the movies I mentioned
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Old 03-03-2005, 16:26   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BizKiTRoAcH
And I think people get more emotional with foreign films because when reading subtitles, you can think of it as ready a book.. and you use your imagination for how it would be said in english.. or something like that!
Good enough explaination for me! How about...

I think people get more emotional with foreign films because...

You tend to be watching them on your own - because all your mates have said "Black & White, subtitled and 4:3! No thanks, mate!" - and are therefore emotionally distraught even before the movie starts!
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Old 03-03-2005, 16:51   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BizKiTRoAcH
House of flying daggers brought a tear to your eye? You are weak!
Oh come on... it's so tragic.
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Old 03-03-2005, 19:55   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BizKiTRoAcH
House of flying daggers brought a tear to your eye? You are weak!
Have to agree mate

btw is "Kikansya Sensei" and Kanzo sensei the same film?
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Old 03-03-2005, 23:24   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R-T-C
In the same way that I like opera in Italian, a foreign language almosts acts as a soundtrack to the film.
I certainly find this to be the case especially with Japanese film. There seems to be something to the Japanese language which I find very pleasing to the ear.
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Old 03-03-2005, 23:52   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brassmonkey001
I certainly find this to be the case especially with Japanese film. There seems to be something to the Japanese language which I find very pleasing to the ear.
I noticed this with "Nowhere to Hide" the Korean film, all the vile language the police were yelling etc. just sounded so nice.
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Old 04-03-2005, 00:20   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angel_eyes
Have to agree mate

btw is "Kikansya Sensei" and Kanzo sensei the same film?
Kikansha Sensei is a relatively new film about a mute school teacher, review here. Sounds like a pretty mainstream sentimental star vehicle, could be worth a watch though. Kanzo Sensei is about a small village doctor at the the end of WWII who's obsessed with diagnosing hepatitis c (Kanzo sensei is his nickname: Dr.Liver).

Only seen the latter myself and it's a brilliant film.
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Old 04-03-2005, 13:57   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shingster
Kikansha Sensei is a relatively new film about a mute school teacher, review here. Sounds like a pretty mainstream sentimental star vehicle, could be worth a watch though. Kanzo Sensei is about a small village doctor at the the end of WWII who's obsessed with diagnosing hepatitis c (Kanzo sensei is his nickname: Dr.Liver).

Only seen the latter myself and it's a brilliant film.
thanks for that - I've seen kanzo sensei and thought it was pretty good too

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Old 04-03-2005, 14:32   #17
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Regardless of language a good film is a good film but I do agree currently what is coming out of Asia (or in the last few years anyway) is far superior then what is currently coming out of the US. I loved foreign film and don’t find subtitles an obstacle or distracting at all and once you have watched a few you can even begin to appreciate the comedy timing.
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Old 04-03-2005, 18:41   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garry Cowell
Good enough explaination for me! How about...

I think people get more emotional with foreign films because...

You tend to be watching them on your own - because all your mates have said "Black & White, subtitled and 4:3! No thanks, mate!" - and are therefore emotionally distraught even before the movie starts!
Haha even better than my explanation!

Quote:
Originally Posted by angel_eyes
btw is "Kikansya Sensei" and Kanzo sensei the same film?
Nope, and I spelt it wrong, its Kikansha Sensei. Here on yesasia:
http://global.yesasia.com/en/prdTran...id-1003881874/
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Old 04-03-2005, 19:02   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brassmonkey001
I certainly find this to be the case especially with Japanese film. There seems to be something to the Japanese language which I find very pleasing to the ear.
I used to think watching anything in Japanese was great and all, you know, highbrow even if it was a cartoon or something.

However I learned Japanese a while ago because of work and now it all sounds just as daft as any English film (especially the cartoons, many of which I find more than painfully childish now) plus quite oftern the acting is revealed to be much worse than I could ever have imagined. There must be tones etc in voices and delivery which you don't pick up if you don't know the language.
If you don't know what I'm talking about check out the English dialogue in returner or even better the Korean lady’s English in Joint Security Area.

Anyway getting back to the point, I think we end up forgiving quite a lot because we don't understand the language, plus a foreign film tends to have a far smaller cult audience so you can quite oftern think of it as your very own precious find, and so becomes more personal

Last edited by FLCL; 04-03-2005 at 19:03.
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Old 04-03-2005, 21:08   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLCL
However I learned Japanese a while ago because of work and now it all sounds just as daft as any English film (especially the cartoons, many of which I find more than painfully childish now) plus quite oftern the acting is revealed to be much worse than I could ever have imagined.
When you say cartoons - do you mean anime? I've always thought the voice acting in anime is generally superb - e.g. Kobayashi's excel springs to mind
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