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Old 13-01-2006, 15:52   #21
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Just watched this today and an excellent film, there is only one set and limit actors. I'm glad i got into the top 100 films now as otherwise would have missed this.

Ending

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Old 07-09-2008, 08:53   #22
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Watched this last night and found it very slow going in the first half but then it picked up towards the end.

The last half an hour was very enthralling.
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Old 07-09-2008, 10:18   #23
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Originally Posted by brunny78 View Post
Great film - in fact one of my favourites. Much prefer it to vertigo which is widely held as Hitchcocks best. What didn't you understand about the ending?
Agreed on all counts. In fact, Rear Window is my favourite Hitchcock film and one of my top 10 of all time, whereas Vertigo did not impress me all that much. But I am also wondering about your confusion or even 'shock' at the ending of RW, which was thrilling but pretty straightforward. If fact, it is one of the few Hitchcockian films where there is no twist in the plot at all. Everything is exactly as the Stewart character...and therefore us...believes to be happening. The beauty of the film is entirley in its pseudo-voyeuristic camerawork and low key sound effects.
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Old 07-09-2008, 11:44   #24
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In fact, Rear Window is my favourite Hitchcock film and one of my top 10 of all time, whereas Vertigo did not impress me all that much.
I may have mentioned this in these forums before, but when I saw Rear Window and Vertigo in a double-bill at the NFT in 1984, the audience I was with was enthralled by the former but laughed mercilessly at the latter. Vertigo is a visual triumph, but the story is foolish and has dated horribly. Scotty's insistence that changing Judy's hair "can't matter" to her makes me wince every time...
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Old 07-09-2008, 16:44   #25
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It is not so much the implausibility of the plot that bothers me about Vertigo. Despite the visual execellency, the script and editing lack the usual tight Hitchcockian approach. Kim Novak's mental flashback and so the revelation about 2/3 of the way into the film is unconvincing and neither here nor there. I often wonder why this film ranks so high among people's all time bests. For me, it is quite low down even on the Hitchcock list.
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Old 07-09-2008, 17:23   #26
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I think Bernard Herrmann's music helps a lot.
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Old 07-09-2008, 22:13   #27
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I think Bernard Herrmann's music helps a lot.
Since this is a thread about Rear Window, if you're commenting on Vertigo please state that, otherwise we'll all think you thought that Herrmann did the music for Rear Window, which he, of course, did not.
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Old 07-09-2008, 22:14   #28
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Watched this last night and found it very slow going in the first half but then it picked up towards the end.

The last half an hour was very enthralling.
Well, you must be young.
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:34   #29
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. . . . when I saw Rear Window and Vertigo in a double-bill at the NFT in 1984, the audience I was with was enthralled by the former but laughed mercilessly at the latter.
I'm appalled . . . . and very surprised.
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:53   #30
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I am surprised too. Although I rate Rear Window considerably higher than Vertigo, I don't think that the latter film is anything to be laughed at. But I agree that it has dated very badly in these 50 years and looked at from a modern perspective, the plot would seem naive to the point of silliness. Nevertheless, it remains an excellent visual spectacle.
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Old 08-09-2008, 06:13   #31
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I've never been keen on Rear Window but, for me, Vertigo is Hitchcock's masterpiece. Maybe it's the difference between reality and fantasy. Is it true that people who love Rear Window dislike Vertigo and vice versa?
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Old 08-09-2008, 07:30   #32
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For me, Rear Window is emotionally empty and far too much of a technical exercise. It's too schematic, like Rope, which it resembles in its technical challenge. Some of the sexual badinage of Grace Kelly and the handicapped Stewart is vaguely amusing, however. In terms of plot and plausibility, Vertigo is utter rubbish, cornball psychology, and indeed laughable; but the mise-en-scene, those endlessly creeping shots, that swooning, Wagnerian music, the utter helplessness of Stewart and the glacial beauty of Novak makes it an emotional rollercoaster.
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:46   #33
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[QUOTE]
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Originally Posted by Wendell Armbruster View Post
For me, Rear Window is emotionally empty and far too much of a technical exercise. It's too schematic, like Rope, which it resembles in its technical challenge.
I have a feeling that was Hitchcock's intention with both those films - Rope is also one of my favourites. He was man who had the tip of his tongue in different parts of his cheek throughout his career. Look at The Trouble With Harry for example; enjoyable hokum, but enjoyable nevertheless. I cannot say the same of Vertigo, unfortunately.

I have met a lot of Hitchcock connoisseurs who love his film 'A' but dislike film 'B' and so on. This thread, with its widely different views on Rear Window & Vertigo will tell you that. I think there may be some truth in that other post which said that a lot of people who like one don't like the other; you and I are two such, but with opposing views .

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the glacial beauty of Novak makes it an emotional rollercoaster.
Maybe there lies the problem. I never considered Novak a 'glacial' or any other kind of beauty - at least not in her youth. Curiously, she did acquire a modicum of poise and elegance in middle age.
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:49   #34
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Is it true that people who love Rear Window dislike Vertigo and vice versa?
I love both
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Old 08-09-2008, 10:48   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Armbruster View Post
The glacial beauty of Novak makes it an emotional rollercoaster.
I'm afraid the only term that I could think of to describe Kim Novak in films like Vertigo, Bell Book & Candle and other films of that era is bovine.
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Old 08-09-2008, 11:30   #36
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I'm afraid the only term that I could think of to describe Kim Novak in films like Vertigo, Bell Book & Candle and other films of that era is bovine.
I don't think Hitch was going for a bovine blonde.
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Old 08-09-2008, 11:40   #37
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I'm afraid the only term that I could think of to describe Kim Novak in films like Vertigo, Bell Book & Candle and other films of that era is bovine.
As Hitchcock reputedly said, actors are . . . like . . . bovine. And, accordingly, I've always been amused by his symbolic use of udders. For example, Stewart's girl-friend designs bras - firm, supportive, cantilevered like the Golden Gate Bridge outside her window - while Novak patently doesn't wear one, so she's unsupported, vulnerable, doesn't take the Bridge but jumps into the water. And given Hitchcock's predilections, I'd say that's at the heart of Vertigo. Udders.
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Old 08-09-2008, 12:23   #38
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I haven't seen Vertigo so will watch that one next.
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Old 08-09-2008, 12:51   #39
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Originally Posted by haineshisway View Post
Since this is a thread about Rear Window, if you're commenting on Vertigo please state that, otherwise we'll all think you thought that Herrmann did the music for Rear Window, which he, of course, did not.
Oh come on! My post followed directly on from a post about "Vertigo" - God, you're so strict!

ps Franz Waxman composed the music for "Rear Window" - but you knew that.

Last edited by Alan George; 08-09-2008 at 12:53.
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Old 08-09-2008, 13:13   #40
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I never considered Novak a 'glacial' or any other kind of beauty - at least not in her youth. Curiously, she did acquire a modicum of poise and elegance in middle age.
I seem to recall that Vera Miles was the original choice for Madeleine but got pregnant, and that Novak was as resistant to the grey-suit and blonde hair-style as Judy Barton!

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