Go Back   Forums @ The Digital Fix > Shopping and Money Forums > Finance Discussion Forum

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 13-04-2008, 20:52   #1
Guest 52699
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
A Short Guide to Making an Insurance Claim

(I've only had experience in home claims not motor so not sure how relevant this will be to that sector).

This is probably as much a guide to understanding the process of the claim, as opposed on how to making it. But hopefully some of this will be useful to someone..

* OK this one is a bit of a selfish one, but it's just to remind you the people on the end of the phone are simply doing their job, and shouting at us won't help you at all. Put across your point, but my job is stressful enough as it is without someone yelling and swearing in my ear because they don't necessarily get what's going on, or are blaming me for someone elses mistake/correct judgment they don't happen to agree with. Just remember that we deal with thousands of claims at once, and we're generally understaffed the majority of the time and if you don't get a telephone call or an instant decision, it's not because we're being lazy or don't care.. it's just a very busy industry and the timescales we're expected to work in aren't always possible.

* Get as much proof of ownership for your items as you possibly can. Keep boxes, manuals, receipts, photographs, valuations.. ANYTHING you can to simply prove you own something. If you can't prove you owned something, why should we believe your claim is real? This is particularly true of jewellery, if you've got expensive pieces then get them properly evaluated and check the policy limits. Do they exceed the policies single article limit? Get them specified separately on the policy. Do they exceed the valuable limit of the policy? Speak to your insurers and see if they can upgrade your cover. Simply specifying something on the policy is *NOT* proof of ownership, all it does it tell me I can make a maximum payment of that figure. It does not guarantee this is the settlement if that item is lost/damaged/stolen.

* Keep up to date with the value of your specified items. The amount of times people have specified expensive video cameras in 1995 and then expect me to pay out this value in 2008.. it's not going to happen. Insurance settlements are based on like for like replacement, and it's very unlikely your £1,500 consumer camera is worth more than a few hundred quid at most 13 years later. It's not the insurers responsibility to make sure you've valued your items correctly.

* For building works, get your own quotes from local builders. Insurance companies use networks of builders that are generally over busy and not always reliable.. it'll make my life and your life easier if you can get me a good breakdown quote of what works need to be done. We might request someone goes out (loss adjuster, or a network builder) to confirm damage and value, but most of the time there won't be an issue making a payment to your builder care of your address to enable your safety, and closing the claim down a lot sooner.

* We'll put you in accommodation whilst your property is uninhabitable, but don't take the ****. If you can sleep in your house, have access to toilet/washing facilities.. then the property is OK to be lived in. If the kitchen is out of action, then we'll pay a figure to cover your extra costs of eating. This isn't a huge sum of money as it'll be the difference of what you usually spend on food anyway and the extra cost of fresh food/takeaway etc. If the lounge is out of action, then just don't go in there.. that isn't a room that you need access to in order to live in the property. A lot of people think insurers are going to take over all the costs of their living whilst a claim is underway, this isn't the case. Look at what your policy covers and ask questions before presuming.

* Your claim, no matter how small it is to you, generally won't be complete in the timescales you think it will. Various companies have to liaise with each-other and agree on costs, agree on cover etc. A simple theft involving loss adjusters and supply companies won't be completed in a week.

* "You're just saying that because you don't want to pay". Utter rubbish, my job is to follow the policy wording. If you don't like the wording, you shouldn't have taken up the policy in the first place. It makes no difference to me if I pay out £10,000 on your claim or £0 on your claim.. I don't get any extra money, but if I make a payment on a claim I can't justify I'm the one who's going to get in trouble.

Hope some of this might help, any questions just bung em in and I'll see if it's something I can help with.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2008, 21:04   #2
Guest 1389
Guest
 
Location: iccy towers
Posts: n/a
Seeing as there's some good info here I've stuck it
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-05-2008, 08:43   #3
ji
Just another member
 
ji's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Lincolnshire UK
Posts: 1,631
Thanks: 4
Thanked 23 Times in 12 Posts
Useful post - thanks.
__________________
It was me! - I brought all the lurkers... :D
ji is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-05-2008, 12:29   #4
darftblerk
Chief Snot Bubbler
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Dursley
Posts: 1,167
Thanks: 14
Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts
In response to your first paragraph re: stressed and understaffed. You have absolutely no sympathy from me, if I wanna shout down the phone at you I will. Insurance companies have lost many of the morals they had yesterday, and therefore are not only a necessity, but one which most people begrudge.

To reiterate, if your understaffed, where are the millions of pounds profit the insurance industry makes each year going? Somebody's winning from this game

Last edited by darftblerk; 18-05-2008 at 12:32.
darftblerk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-05-2008, 13:19   #5
Guest 52699
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I apologise. The people answering your calls are the ones who requested to be understaffed and overloaded with work, and we get paid a fantastic wage for it. Is there something wrong with you? If you've got a problem with the staffing or issues where handlers aren't going to be able to resolve, follow the complaints procedure or contact the ombudsman.. I guarantee you shouting at the guy on the other end of the phone isn't going to achieve anything.

I'm guessing you've never worked retail or customer service, because your post covers pretty much 80% of the idiot calls I have to deal with on a daily basis.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-05-2008, 15:02   #6
Guest 53
Guest
 
Location: Beacons on the doorstep.
Posts: n/a
Whilst there's no excuse for shouting at someone down the phone, Daftberk has a point. Why should the customer put up with rubbish service or have to explain the situation to a different person every time they phone just because the Co. is understaffed? That is not an issue the customer should have to deal with, thats an issue that the employee's should be raising with their employer. Its not an excuse for crap customer service.

The rest of the post is very useful, thank you
  Reply With Quote
Old 19-05-2008, 01:58   #7
statto
Jedi Master
 
statto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 15,511
Thanks: 110
Thanked 405 Times in 194 Posts
Good post, but I agree with daftblerk and Sam. If someone's calling you, chances are they're more stressed than you are.
statto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-06-2008, 14:53   #8
Guest 12112
Guest
 
Location: Stafford
Posts: n/a
Sorry this post is a little late.

Shouting at the handler on the other end isn't going to help the situation, no one has the right to shout down the phone at anyone, no matter how stressed they maybe.

Going off track a little bit and on to call centres in general.

If you want someone to blame because of the way your call is handled, blame the senior management, who put AHT (average handling time) targets on calls the agents receive and all the other hoops the agents have to jump through in order to keep their jobs.

You have my sympathies pockymonster.

I think all targets should be scrapped and handlers should be allowed to do everything for their customers in one call to eliminate the shouting down the phone from the customers.

If your call is cut off after 3 minutes, don't shout at the next agent when you phone back in a rage, it isn't their fault.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2008, 08:02   #9
Squattie
Trusted User
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 338
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
With regards to proof of ownership - I've thought in the past of using my DSLR to get some decent, hi-res images of my DVD collection, AV equipment/games consoles etc.

For items that I may not be able to find receipts for would most insurance companies accept this as proof of ownership. It's just it did occur to me that it could look somewhat suspect that I'd made the effort to do it!
Squattie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2008, 09:39   #10
d.boyd1uk
[DVDF]boyde2k7
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Swansea, Wales
Posts: 6,113
Thanks: 14
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Can you m ake a video of everything you own? would that be just as good as photos?
d.boyd1uk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2008, 21:10   #11
mattymoo
Gamertag: stevie40
 
mattymoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Lincolnshire, UK
Posts: 2,860
Thanks: 41
Thanked 9 Times in 8 Posts
I used to do security audits for high net worth (loaded) customers and we often used to suggest photos as a useful back up.

1) you could give a copy to the police although this was usually in relation to some work of art or antique item it applies just as well to AV / gaming gear etc.
2) A copy can be given to the loss adjuster handling your claim.
3) As well as close ups of unusual, expensive items you should also take general shots of each room - this acts as an aide memoire to yourself so you can remember everything you had in the event of a major fire.

Remember to keep a copy of the negs / memory card / CD at work or a relatives house just in case you have a big fire.

Video woud satisfy point 3 but it is harder to make copies (especially if your av / computing kit has been damaged / stolen) and you may need to make up to 4 copies (insurers, police, loss adjuster and loss assessor).
mattymoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-07-2008, 22:38   #12
Guest 18945
Guest
 
Location: uk
Posts: n/a
I'm sorry but I have no sympathy for you either. In a perfect world teachers would get respect from their students, hospitals wouldn’t be under staffed and bin-men wouldn’t be paid minimum wage. If you choose to work in a customer service environment then you need to accept dealing with upset and irate customers is part of the job. I've worked in an IT customer service role and almost every other call involved a frustrated, irritated or pi$!ed end-user. Personally, getting shouted at never bothered or affected my ability to do the job. What did bother me however was the peanuts I was paid and the fact I was expected to work a 9 hour shift, covering weekends too, with a couple of 10 minute breaks and 20 minutes for lunch. I stuck this out for 12 months and used the experience to secure my next job. I think it’s fair to say, in general, call centre employees have a bad reputation. I know from first-hand experience they’re rarely treated with any kind of respect from management or customers. I'll probably get a battering for saying this, but IMO I found there are four stereo-types when it comes to customer service agents (or whatever else they're called these days) :
- someone (usually college/uni graduates) looking to use the position as a stepping stone
- people with little career ambition
- middle aged people looking for a career change or a part time job before retirement
- finally... people who can just about read/follow a script but that’s about all they can manage
Unfortunately call centres are full of people like this and the public are aware of it. Therefore when a customer needs to make a claim they usually make the call anticipating an 'I don’t care' attitude from the reprehensive on the other end of the phone. In effect, the atmosphere has already been set before the customer has even picked up the phone.
At the end of the day insurance is a service we pay for and in some cases we have to take out (ie: motor or buildings insurance). We pay our money each year in the hope we never have to cash in on it. For those of us who’ve never make claims, its dead money and the insurance lenders/brokers profit from this big time. If you are ever in the unfortunate position where you need to make a claim, the last thing you want is to be interrogated and have to prove everything you’ve had stolen or damaged, etc. You were happy to take our money without question, why should we have to prove everything when it comes to claims! What’s more, you penalise us for making a claim and our next premium will increase to compensate you for the claim we made? What a ridiculous system, I suppose it’s our own fault for accepting it!

Last edited by PREECY; 30-07-2008 at 13:20.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28-01-2009, 15:23   #13
R-T-C
Klaus Kinksi's pet dog
 
R-T-C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Keighley, UK
Posts: 2,982
Thanks: 35
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
A note from someone who has worked in travel insurance.

1) Read the policy booklet BEFORE going on holiday. Especially if you have courtesy insurance via a bank account etc. Many policies will only cover holidays for so many days and some of them might even exclude high-cost areas like the USA. Trips in the UK are generally not covered unless you have pre-booked accommodation for more than 3 nights. If you fall foul of this, you won't be able to claim.

2) If something is stolen or lost tell someone there and then. For theft you should report this to the police, but your local tour operator should also be able to help if you are on an organised holiday. Either way, get something in writing. Do not wait until you get home before remembering.

3) Medical treatement - again you MUST READ THE POLICY BOOKLET OR YOU MIGHT LOSE OUT COMPLETELY. Many insurance companies will expect you to contact them if you are in hospital for more than 24 hours if not less so they can negotiate with the hospital in regards to payment. You might well be given an emergency contact number, keep this with you. Without your insurance details you might end up being footed with a giant bill before you can go home.
__________________
Mondo Esoterica - cult and obscure film and DVD reviews | Flickr Gallery - British motorsports photography and more.
R-T-C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-10-2009, 16:14   #14
Guest 21149
Guest
 
Location: Loughton, Essex
Posts: n/a
I had some damage to my property (wall and driveway) rendering it unuseable and it was reported to the third parties insurance co. At the time they told me to get two quotes for each repair and submit which I did. I also rang them giving them a deadline to respond by which they didnt and I authorised the work. They are now sending out a loss adjuster which I cannot meet as I am working abroad!

I return abroad on Monday and today I recieved a letter from the LA that as I havent responded that I no longer wish to pursue the matter (lies) and they will inform the insurance co to close the case

What should I do?

In this scenario how can I ensure I can reiumbursed for all the damages?

Thanks
Jig
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-10-2009, 19:53   #15
Wishy
Wonkey Shooter
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Woking
Posts: 3,328
Thanks: 4
Thanked 42 Times in 40 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by jig View Post
I had some damage to my property (wall and driveway) rendering it unuseable and it was reported to the third parties insurance co. At the time they told me to get two quotes for each repair and submit which I did. I also rang them giving them a deadline to respond by which they didnt and I authorised the work. They are now sending out a loss adjuster which I cannot meet as I am working abroad!

I return abroad on Monday and today I recieved a letter from the LA that as I havent responded that I no longer wish to pursue the matter (lies) and they will inform the insurance co to close the case

What should I do?

In this scenario how can I ensure I can reiumbursed for all the damages?

Thanks
Jig
Write back to them and advise them you wish to pursue the claim. I believe you have 6 or 7 years to make the claim. Their polices are irrelevant
Wishy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2011, 13:57   #16
Guest 80914
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
These guides are really very beneficial for us who are seeking claim form medical company.Really very supportive blog of yours.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25-10-2014, 17:46   #17
Barny79
Trusted User
 
Barny79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 22,451
Thanks: 169
Thanked 99 Times in 60 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vensuala View Post
In response to your first paragraph re: stressed and understaffed. You have absolutely no sympathy from me, if I wanna shout down the phone at you I will. Insurance companies have lost many of the morals they had yesterday, and therefore are not only a necessity, but one which most people begrudge.

To reiterate, if your understaffed, where are the millions of pounds profit the insurance industry makes each year going? Somebody's winning from this game


_______________
Johni Patino..!!
You're a feisty "new" member. This shall be interesting
__________________
You wanted Kaka, but you got Bellamy, oh City are a MASSIVE club!
Barny79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-10-2014, 19:13   #18
Alan b
Administrator
 
Alan b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 35,048
Thanks: 171
Thanked 1,285 Times in 581 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barny79 View Post
You're a feisty "new" member. This shall be interesting
A feisty new member who in their two posts so far have copied word for word what somebody else has posted
Alan b is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanked once by:
Barny79 (25-10-2014)
Old 20-12-2014, 10:52   #19
Guest 86893
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
PockyMonster! Your short guide about the Insurance claim is very nice. I really appreciated it. I am sure it will help me a lot in my future. The nice one point and most important is that keep the proof as much as you can because without proof we cannot do anything and no will help us.
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
finance, insurance, Money

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:44.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018 Poisonous Monkey Ltd. Part of The Digital Fix Network