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Old 23-07-2004, 15:48   #21
Wendelius
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Some of my favourite series and definitely must reads:

- For those with an appetite for alternate history, intrigue and mythology, I highly recommend the Kushiel (Dart, Chosen and Avatar) by Jacqueline Carey. Very well written and lots of intrigue. May shock some though as it is about a courtesan of a special kind trained as a spy.

- Riftwar Saga (Magician and onwards) and the Empire Series (Servant, ...) by Raymond E. Feist (and J. Wurts for the Empire books)
- Memory, Sorrow and Thorn by Tad Williams. Starts slowly but very gripping.
- A song of Fire and Ice series by George R.R. Martin
- The Dark Tower series by Stephen King
- The Talisman and Black House by King and Straub
- The Discworld books by Terry Pratchett
- The first 4 Vampire books by Anne Rice (until the body thief. After that, I thought the series became less interesting)
- The Farseer and Liveship Traders series by Robin Hobb. They are a nice deviation from the usual fantasy plotlines.
- The Harry Potter books. Do not dismiss them as mere children books. The books evolve nicely.

- Dune by Frank Herbert
- Otherland and sequels by Tad Williams
- The Robot series by Asimov. Great stories.
- The first 2 Rama books by Arthur C. Clarke
- Ender's Game. Loved it. Wasn't so fond of the sequels.
- Believe it or not, the Star Wars: Thrawn Trilogy by Timothy Zahn is one of the most favoured Star Wars novel series and a good fun read even for non rabid fans.


I'm staying away from Wheel of Time until Jordan finally completes the series. I read 5 or 6, the story started slowing down and having to wait an eternity between books didn't help.

There are no doubt lots of others.

Wendelius
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Old 23-07-2004, 19:57   #22
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Fantasy is my genre of choice and I'll pretty much read anything, my favourite authors are

George RR Martin - A song of Ice and Fire
Robin Hobbs books - 3 series but I read them as one (The farseer trilogy, the liveship traders, the tawny man) - her Megan Lindholm books are pretty good as well
JV Jones's books
Jude Fisher's books Fools Gold is excellent
Terry pratchett’s Disc world books ( great light reads read in between more meaty books)

There are tonnes of others (pretty much all mentioned above that I really enjoyed as well, but I can't be bothered to list them all out again.

Stephen
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Old 23-07-2004, 20:13   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendelius

I'm staying away from Wheel of Time until Jordan finally completes the series. I read 5 or 6, the story started slowing down and having to wait an eternity between books didn't help.

Wendelius

Tell me about it - I'm on path of daggers and have read 600 pages with absolutley nothing happening.
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Old 23-07-2004, 21:48   #24
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Dark Tower books (Stephen King) are quite good.

Wizard & Glass is probably my favourite so far & Gunslinger was my least favourite. All are good and should be read in order.
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Old 23-07-2004, 22:36   #25
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As lnogas your not a happy alcoholic sharp circle. No I can honorably tell Mr Shatner I have got a life. A girl woulod be nice though, and my bosses wife seems to think I'm an anorak cos I like SF.

I must admit my favourite SF story of all media is Babylon 5, cos it has the evocative dialogue you read books for (eg G'Kars description of things out there we are not meant to know about in season 1), and the intellectual ideas that you also find in novels (the whole idealogy of the series that one person can make a difference for instance) and has the visuals of TV and Film and the greatest story I have seen, being so complex with the various character plots as we see them develop and change through their choices and fate, as well as a great showing of how easy Earth can turn fascist (as someone has mentioned here before, it parallels George W Bush's rule, where to speak out against the state is to be a terrorist (a lot of great fiction is pertinant like this, because you are dealing in universal truths), and some truly tragic moments.

Anyway, rant over, and nothing can beat Star Wars (spoken like a true fan boy! I can appreciate intellectually that B5 is the better story, but my heart will always have a special spot for the faves of my youth).
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Old 23-07-2004, 23:32   #26
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oh dear - I see arguments in our trip

I don't really like babylon 5. But to be fair I havent really watched a lot of it.

aside from film - what books do you like (and Alien is my favourite sci fi - followed closely by the star wars trilogy)
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Old 24-07-2004, 08:56   #27
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If u look at my post on page 1 you will see a long list of fave genre books, my fave book is The Essential Ellison (which beats B5 by the way, but its not just sf, ellison covers everything, tv criticism, essays etc, with some of the greatest stories its been my pleasure to read) which I posted my review to on your favaourite book thread.

I was quite pleased with myself when the Big Read came out to find that I had read a third off the books on the list (mind you the majority of my reads were the books I read as a kid and genre stuff).

I actually like near enoguh all books, got a book on chaos theory which I never get around to finishing! Currently finishing Bill Hicks Biography and then I'm onto a George Orwell novel, Down and Out in the streets of London and Paris where he spent a year living with the tramps and wrote of his experiences.
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Old 24-07-2004, 18:34   #28
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Larry Niven - Ringworld. Original believable hard SF space culture
Harry Harrison - Make room, The scariest SF novel ever.
Kim Stanley Robinson - Red Mars, The textbook on how to colonise a planet.
Jeff Noon - Pollen/Vurt, the brits start writing modern SF
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Old 25-07-2004, 00:49   #29
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loved Pollen and Vurt then tried Automated Alice and couldn't give into it and gave up cos it was written in the style of a childs book, reading about it recently should I have persevered, does the writing style change once she gets into manchester? Got up to about page 90 if I remember rightly.

Is it wtill worth reading Make Room even though I've seen syolent green, is it very different?
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Old 26-07-2004, 13:47   #30
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Automated Alice I didn't like, Nymphomation was so-so.

Make Room is excellent, the scariest thing is that the eating people isn't the scariest thing !
The descriptions of being trapped for days in a crowd trying to cross the road and the rules to cope with life are much scarier than just eating people. I have to go and find my copy and read it again.
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Old 26-07-2004, 15:24   #31
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"The descriptions of being trapped for days in a crowd trying to cross the road"

I recognise that, I was outside Big Ben for the Millenium. Their were waves and you would get carried along in the direction you didn't want to go till you eventually got through to the other sid eof the road where you were carried along in the direction you did.
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Old 27-07-2004, 11:52   #32
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No votes for Terry Brooks?

Damn, I must be strange, Shannara books are ace (imo...)

I've got every one...

oh and R.A.Salvatore get's my vote too.

Drizzt Do'Urden rocks.

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Old 27-07-2004, 12:20   #33
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A few horror novels I'd recommend

Darkfall - Stephen Laws
A superb british author who sets most of his books in the north-east of england. Really keeps you gripped.

Burial - Graham Masterton
An epic horror novel which ties in pieces of American history to good effect.

Midnight - Dean Koontz
I'm not a huge fan of Koontz as too many of his novels seem to be exactly the same to me, there are some exceptions however, Midnight being one of them. Twilight Eyes is worth a look too =)
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Old 27-07-2004, 13:55   #34
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I'm going through a lot of the older "classics" at the moment and I have enjoyed some real gems.

Last and first men - Olaf Stapledon. This book is awesome in it's scope. It'll make you as insignificant as a piece of dust.
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The City and the Stars - Arthur C Clarke. IMHO, his best.
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I Am Legend - Richard Matheson. What a story, just wish it was a 1000 pages long. No I don't, it's perfect!
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Old 27-07-2004, 16:53   #35
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Anne Mccaffrey's books are good there are several genres
The pern book
The talent books To ride a Pegasus starts that series off
The ship Who sang and the books that where written with other authors
The ship who searched
Partnership etc
The Crystal Singer/Killeshandre/Crystal lines

Terry Pratchetts books
Piers Anthony's Incantations of Immortality
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Old 02-08-2004, 21:28   #36
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I can't belive no one has mentioned Fritz Lieber!?!? He was the first to use the term 'Swords and Sorcery' (taken from his Times obituary) . For a BIG list of his stuff, go to http://www.lankhmar.demon.co.uk/

The Lankhmar Novels are very good.

David Gemmell's "Jon Shannow" Novels Wolf in Shadow, Last Guardian, Bloodstone very good indeed.

The offical sequal to The Time Machine, The Time Ships by Stephen Baxter.

The Flashman Papers by Geroge Macdonald Fraiser
The Time Wars and Wizard of 4th Street series by Simon Hawke
although most of these are out of print.


I thought I would list a few that havnt been mentioned before.

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Old 02-08-2004, 21:35   #37
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I'm suprised nobody's mentioned James Herbert. Rats, Lair and Domain are particular good.
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Old 02-08-2004, 21:49   #38
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Two of my favourites:

King's best: The Stand

And (IMO) Koontz's best: Watches
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Old 31-03-2005, 10:59   #39
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Although I've loved sci-fi/fantasy all my life, I've only started into delve into novels outside of Star Wars/Star Trek in the last three years or so, and I'm finding some great stuff out there... and some not-so-great stuff.

Definitely agree with A Song Of Fire And Ice series by George R. R. Martin. I've only read the first book and about to start the second, but it really grabbed me, very much looking forward to continuing. More of a political thriller set in medieval times, but fantasy elements are all there.

Stephen King's Dark Tower series is great, I'll be starting book 4 (Wizard And Glass) after I finish the book mentioned above. I must say I really didn't enjoy the first book (The Gunslinger) though, and it put me off the series completely. Decided to read the second book just to see if it was better and it was. A LOT better.

Harry Potter! I disagree with what many fans try to say, these are definitely childrens books but they are just plain fun and there is enough intrigue to keep me reading.

I just read the first story in the Orcs omnibus by Stan Nicholls. This is very fast paced, action-oriented stuff and is quite a lot of fun to read, if pretty light. The whole thing flows without taking a breath. Strangely though, seems to completely go against all descriptions of Orcs I've ever come across, these guys are articulate and intelligent which is a little hard to imagine as you read.

The Black Magician Trilogy by Trudi Canavan. Again, I've only read the first book and have the second waiting to read. This is also a good fun story which I got the impression was aimed more towards young adults. It's well thought out and has an interesting subject matter though. Sort of reminded me of Terry Pratchett if he was trying to be a bit more serious.

Speaking of Terry Pratchett, I have to say I don't enjoy a huge amount of his books but Mort really got me, absolutely fantastic story and simply hilarious. Anything where he focuses on the character Death is worth reading! Wasn't so enthusiastic about the Discworld books previous to this, I think this is where the series really takes off. Must try to get around to reading more.

Can't not mention Lord Of The Rings, absolute must read which I've been through twice now. Easily the best fantasy story ever.

And if I may briefly go into Star Wars territory, the Thrawn Trilogy starting with Heir To The Empire by Timothy Zahn is simply incredible. An unbelievely well written story which goes off in quite a different direction from the (original) films and presents a really grown up story full of intrigue, politics and action. Worth reading even if you don't love Star Wars.

Quickly mentioning some stuff I tried and didn't really like - Terry Brooks Shannara stuff is horrid. Terribly written rip-off of other fantasy. I started the Wheel Of Time by Robert Jordan and it didn't take me long to stop, I simply couldn't stand his writing style and I had to force myself to keep going. I also got close to half way through Magican by Raymond Feist before I had to return it to the library but I'm really not bothered about continuing. While the story wasn't half bad, it was written with very little depth and I was started to get somewhat uninterested.

And lastly, Kevin J. Anderson's Saga Of The Seven Suns series is one of the worst things I've ever had the misfortune to read. I usually love this guys stuff but this was horrid. Made up of mini-chapters focusing on different characters, but none of them seem to connect or flow together and the story doesn't really go anywhere (and when it does it's not that interesting).

Phew!

Last edited by LeftHandedGuitarist; 31-03-2005 at 11:02.
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Old 31-03-2005, 13:02   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorki
I'm suprised nobody's mentioned James Herbert. Rats, Lair and Domain are particular good.

I finally got round to reading those this year, and they are excellent - Specially when you subsequently get spooked on the tube visiting London!

One of his newer ones, "Once" is stunning too. Read that on the bus down - It deals with a man who finds out when he moves back to his family home that faeries, goblins and all the creatures of our myths and legends are real - And the consequences of that fact.

I've actually been powering throug a fair number of his books this year.
Tip Read "Haunted" BEFORE you read "The Ghosts Of Sleath".

Survivor, Creed - Also both excellent.
And, obviously, The Magic Cottage.
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