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fivebyfive
14-06-2004, 21:04
from eurogamer

http://www.eurogamer.net/article.php?article_id=55768

The Sun, the biggest selling daily tabloid newspaper in Britain, has published a report quoting a "top brain expert" who calls for Nintendo games including Mario Kart: Double Dash to be banned on the grounds of causing epileptic fits.

Speaking to the tabloid, Aston University's head of clinical neuro-psychology, Professor Graham Harding, said that "we need guidelines like those in broadcasting to make sure games with flashing light patterns that have the potential to cause an attack are eliminated."

The Sun reports that the professor wants to see the games - with Mario Kart: Double Dash highlighted as the key culprit - banned

The Sun newspaper should have a health warning on the paper "may cause retarded Chav like behaviour".

FBI
14-06-2004, 21:08
Originally posted by fivebyfive
The Sun newspaper should have a health warning on the paper "may cause retarded Chav like behaviour".

:lol:

Matt KB
14-06-2004, 21:08
Lol he wants to see the games banned because they cause Epilepsy. :cuckoo: There's a warning that ALL games MIGHT cause after long play. If people can't read at that age an epileptic seizure is the worst of their worries.


You think he'd be focusing on worse things like, say, drugs. Or marmite.

HaloMan
14-06-2004, 21:17
The Sun: Welcome to 10 years ago. Please enjoy your stay. :|

Arch Stanton
14-06-2004, 21:21
Was the article sponsered by Sony?

Scottola
14-06-2004, 21:27
I'm sure they wheeled this guy out months ago on a BBC3 Documentary about Nintendo and he did a test on Mario Kart.

It was the Rainbow Road track that posed a problem. It still seemed cobblers though.

camaj
14-06-2004, 21:40
Has The Sun got it in for Nintendo? Anyone remeber the Mario killed my son headlines?

mattsday
14-06-2004, 21:43
Originally posted by camaj
Has The Sun got it in for Nintendo? Anyone remeber the Mario killed my son headlines?
Yup, that's showing my age :dork:

I saw the docu too, wasn't too impressed with his evidence either

DM
14-06-2004, 21:46
Rupert Murdoch iz a PS2 fanboy!!!1111

Matt KB
14-06-2004, 22:11
Originally posted by Dave Metcalf
Rupert Murdoch iz a PS2 fanboy!!!1111


http://www.partyboyusa.co.uk/fanboy_rupert.jpg

carryonline
14-06-2004, 22:59
Nice to see a bit of Nintendo bashing to redress the balance. After all, the PS2 causes deep vein thrombosis, according to the same paper a few months ago.

The Sun - you've got to laugh :oh-hum:

Jimmyboy
15-06-2004, 00:03
Sorry but Nintendo games are more likely to trigger fits and the Sun is absolutely right with this claim. I know a guy who was perfectly healthy and went into convulsions playing Nintendo. There's a link between fits and Nintendo going back to the SNES days and it was that console which largely resulted in video game publishers having to put warnings on all their software. Nintendo have always denied and played down this partly because they could be hit with billions of dollars worth of law suits if they didn't but there is a medically proven link which seems to suggest Nintendo stuff is more likely to trigger fits than any of the other consoles, probably something to do with the way they design their own software.

Joober
15-06-2004, 00:35
I doubt Nintendo is more likely to trigger fits than any other videogame company. I think it's more a case of 'let's pick on a big name company because they're all the same'. Anyone remember when a newspaper reported something about the Nintendo Saturn (or something similar? :oh-hum: )

camaj
15-06-2004, 00:59
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
Nintendo stuff is more likely to trigger fits than any of the other consoles, probably something to do with the way they design their own software.

WTF? How are their games more likely to cause fits than another? All games are equaly likely to do it regardless of console so all have to warn consumers.

Paul Lynock
15-06-2004, 01:17
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
Sorry but Nintendo games are more likely to trigger fits and the Sun is absolutely right with this claim. I know a guy who was perfectly healthy and went into convulsions playing Nintendo. There's a link between fits and Nintendo going back to the SNES days and it was that console which largely resulted in video game publishers having to put warnings on all their software. Nintendo have always denied and played down this partly because they could be hit with billions of dollars worth of law suits if they didn't but there is a medically proven link which seems to suggest Nintendo stuff is more likely to trigger fits than any of the other consoles, probably something to do with the way they design their own software.

Are you taking the Hilary? I thought you were when I starting reading your post, but when I'd finished I wasn't so sure... Just to let you know, I had a seizure whilst playing ISS Pro on the PlayStation about 6 years ago... :suspect: :searchme:

Saying that, maybe you're right about Nintendo's games being the main cause... People's brains go into overload when they realise how great and original their games are. They just can't take it after putting up with 3 years of generic PS2 bland-em-ups ;)

Jimmyboy
15-06-2004, 01:38
Should have known the Ninty fanboys would take it personally.
This isn't a my console is better than yours thread. There's a proven medical link and Nintendo have been condemned considerably more than any other manufacturer of consoles for a considerably longer period of time. Now you can either believe that there's some global conspiracy by medial research teams the world over to put a fat plumber out of business or you can except that maybe they have a point. The newspaper is probably blowing it out of proportion but that doesn't mean there isn't a valid point to be made either.

fivebyfive
15-06-2004, 06:50
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
Nintendo stuff is more likely to trigger fits than any of the other consoles, probably something to do with the way they design their own software.

:cuckoo:


it's so sad, you actually believe that.

before you call me a nintendo fan boy, I own a GC and a xbox and they are both good consoles. Anyway from you previous postings you act like an xbox fan boy

ozric99
15-06-2004, 07:07
Sounds like a job for Killer Japanese Seizure Robots (http://www.seizurerobots.com/)
(warning.. epilepsy.. flashing.. blah blah.. whatever :))

snoopstah
15-06-2004, 07:28
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
There's a proven medical link...
In that case you should have no problem finding proof and showing it to us. And by proof I don't mean sensationalist news articles.

Ds3
15-06-2004, 07:57
I can quite believe one console can cause fits more so than another, those of you saying "all games have equal chance of giving you fits" are being a bit naive imo. It depends completely on what aspect of the games is causing the problems, and how this is written into different coding methods. It is widely recognised that playing games for extended periods can causes you problems, and as Nintendos game style is very different from that of other consoles it's very possible the way their games are made can have a more adverse effect on you than the other consoles. This could also be true for any other consoles though.

That said, I have seen no evidence to suggest that Ninendo are worse than any other. Whilst I recognise there is a possibility Jimmyboy is right and am not just shooting him down like some people, I would also like to see some back up evidence for this proven medical link.

smst
15-06-2004, 09:01
I thought the original seizure-causing games were those with high degrees of flicker, causing a reaction in the same way as strobe lighting etc. I do remember Nintendo taking a lot of flak for this a few years ago, but then it was only going to be Nintendo or Sega as Sony and Microsoft weren't building consoles back then. Maybe some particular SNES games were over-ambitious in their use of sprites, and everything started flickering.

If this "top brain expert" has a problem with Rainbow Road, I'd presume it was because of the fast-moving very colourful display. Fair enough if that causes problems, but to lay the blame squarely at Nintendo's door seems an inappropriate conclusion: what about Tempest 2000, or the forthcoming Unity? What about the hordes of dance games with flashing disco backgrounds on all consoles?

I'd be really interested to see evidence of the supposed proven medical link between Nintendo games specifically and epileptic seizures -- assuming this link isn't present for other other games or consoles (otherwise it's like saying there's a proven link between Ford cars and road deaths, focussing on one brand instead of the general technology). Is there a suggestion that all generations of Nintendo hardware display images in a seizure-triggering way that all other manufacturers have avoided? Or that Nintendo games are specifically to blame (the company's focus on innovation and fun also including a remit to fill their games with flicker, perhaps)? I'd find it hard to believe that more people play Nintendo games for longer -- more people own the other consoles, and there are surely a lot of people who play marathon sessions of GTA, Gran Turismo, Tekken, and all the other popular games which aren't Nintendo exclusives.

A few years ago I remember a tabloid running a report on a child who played vide games so much (every day for many hours) that he started to get RSI, or CTS or something like that. There were calls then for Nintendo to take responsibility -- for the actions of a child who didn't read the warnings in the instruction booklet, and whose parents either didn't read those warnings or chose to ignore them and their own common sense. I remember this incident as the hilarious headline "Nintendonitis" (geddit? Inflammation of the tendons!) seemed geared to blame the console company rather than anyone involved in that specific situation.

biggis
15-06-2004, 09:14
I thought that back in the day it was SEGA that was accused of causing everyones fits because of the sonic games. :searchme:

Pistol
15-06-2004, 09:16
Yeah, it's like saying that watching BBC is more likely to give you a seizure than watching ITV.

Perhaps it was a Nintendo game that brought this whole flickering video games/seizures thing to light ages ago, but now all console makers are aware of the problem and required to do something about it. Nintendo undoubtedly more so than most!

Bolch
15-06-2004, 09:30
Originally posted by smst
A few years ago I remember a tabloid running a report on a child who played vide games so much (every day for many hours) that he started to get RSI, or CTS or something like that.

IIRC he was playing one of the Gran Tourismo games and it was the vibrating from the Dual Shock Controller that caused this. But he was playing for something like 6/8 hours a day

ozric99
15-06-2004, 09:37
http://www.joestoner.com/games/dolphin.swf

hookbeak
15-06-2004, 09:44
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
There's a proven medical link and Nintendo have been condemned considerably more than any other manufacturer of consoles for a considerably longer period of time.

Also :

The Earth is flat.

sigur
15-06-2004, 10:35
Originally posted by hookbeak
Also :

The Earth is flat.

:lol:

fantastic

TheCookieMonster
15-06-2004, 10:52
I remember when I used to play F Zero on the N64 it gave me a headache almost everytime :thinking:

Markuswu
15-06-2004, 10:58
Bah! EVERYONE Knows Nintendo hate there fans.. first they delay all there games comming to PAL, then they strike on this new idea..

Instead of driving there customers away with bad service.. they are going to kill them instead by using the latest "fit-code" that melts your brain

Makes perfect business sence to kill all your customers :D

nwgarratt
15-06-2004, 12:24
carryonline wrote,
Nice to see a bit of Nintendo bashing to redress the balance. After all, the PS2 causes deep vein thrombosis, according to the same paper a few months ago.

I saw that on the news. I thought what do you expect? The kid didn't move for over 6 hours while playing the game.

stampax
15-06-2004, 12:45
But..............................








Surely the sun newspaper wouldnt lie?

Jimmyboy
15-06-2004, 12:57
I guess it's too much to ask to expect a bit of maturity from the usual suspects of ninty fanboys.

A quick look at epilepsy.co.uk -

Professor Graham Harding, former director of the Neurosciences Research Institute at Aston University and world expert on photosensitive epilepsy, has discovered that four Nintendo computer games contain flashing repetitive light sequences that may induce epileptic seizures in photosensitive children.

He now calls for warnings to be printed on the packaging of these games and for safety guidelines to be brought in to the video game industry similar to those used in the broadcasting industry.

Mega Man X, Super Mario Sunshine, Metroid Prime and Mario Kart: Double Dash all contain light patterns which could cause a seizure in approximately 1 in 4000 people but are still on sale in Britain and throughout the world. People aged between 7 and 20 are five times more at risk than the rest of the population, and three-quarters of patients will remain photosensitive for life.

In a BBC3 documentary called Outrageous Fortunes - Nintendo presenter Libby Potter travels around the world to find out more about the Japanese company. The program examines evidence that Nintendo may have known that some of its games could cause epileptic seizures in some children, and chose not to remove the problem sections from the games. In court the company claimed it had no way of knowing which games might be more inclined to trigger seizures in susceptible children, but a whistleblower tells a very different story.

This does show that 3 of the games held accountable were from Nintendo and when put into context with the plethora of claims from people who have suffered directly from playing Nintendo games, the lack of claims criticising other consoles, and the fact that it's proven that some sections of games are more problematic than others, then you start to see a pattern emerging in which the entirely self regulating Nintendo have been creating software which contains more flashing and repetitive sequences more consistently than other video game producers. I've never claimed there's something specifically wrong with the console/s itself, but rather with the way in which Nintendo design their games and the types of games they generally create - Basic common sense tells you that the likes of Viewtiful Joe are going to hit the high end of problematic in this regard. Of course Ninty crack pots will claim that there are many other games on other formats which use similar light sequences but the difference is that the producers of those games on other formats don't consistently use these problematic sequences in their overall software catalouge as systematically as Nintendo's own software department. So if you own a Nintendo console then the vast bulk of software you will play will be Nintendo's own, which is why the Nintendo console is considered to be more likely to cause fits than other consoles.

Personally I think this problem needs to be exposed more rather than childishly trying to defend a favourite console of choice or simply dismiss it as sensationalist clap trap. It is kids after all who are the largest consumers of Nintendo and other distributors software.

Harsin
15-06-2004, 13:03
Nintendo have just released a statement on the subject.

Nintendotm admits that some of it's games cause epilepsy. However to enjoy our full range of neural problems you should connect your Nintendotm Gamecubetm to a Gameboytm Advancetm SPtm. Watching flashing lights on the two screens at once will give you access to the full range of features such as jerking frantically and frothing at the mouth. Buy it at your local store today!*

*Not available in Europe until Winter 2017.

Way_2_FAT
15-06-2004, 13:05
Eh?

Those epilepsy warnings are found on my old NES games instruction manauals, so what's new here? :searchme:

ryonhilluk
15-06-2004, 14:19
Originally posted by camaj
Has The Sun got it in for Nintendo? Anyone remeber the Mario killed my son headlines?

Im sure i read one story with a Nintendo headline in the press and it was a playstation that was causing the problem.

Markuswu
15-06-2004, 14:21
I rember a few years back there was that big scare, about how some kid played Mario and rammed his head through a 4inch solid oak or some garbage like that

A-typical sun garbage, jump on a story line and hype it beyond believe, next they will be telling people that watching TV (Except Sky of course ;)) lets kiddy fiddlers into your house or some crap

HaloMan
15-06-2004, 15:58
For a start:
Mega Man X - Created by Capcom. Not Nintendo's fault at all.
Metroid Prime - Created by Retro Studios NOT the parent company of Nintendo. Nintendo don't have that much control over a subsidary. That leaves Super Mario Sunshine and Mario Kart: Double Dash.

Now, I might be a cynic, but it does seem rather odd that the guy has singled out 4 games avaliable exclusively avaliable on Nintendo's consoles. I'm sure it isn't just Nintendo whose games cause epileptic fits - its just they need a scapegoat and Nintendo happens to make lots of games as well as consoles, so they are ideal. Paul Lynock has already said that he had a seizure when he played ISS Pro... so it surely isn't just Nintendo games.

Thirdly, isn't epilepsy more prevailant depending on how your TV is set up? Why aren't The Sun criticising television makers for allowing high contrasts that can encourage epilepsy? Because they wouldn't get away with it - it's too mainstream. Many of The Sun's readers still see games - particularly Nintendo's - as not in their intrest and therefore negatively. So it's an easy target.

camaj
15-06-2004, 15:59
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
Personally I think this problem needs to be exposed more rather than childishly trying to defend a favourite console of choice or simply dismiss it as sensationalist clap trap. It is kids after all who are the largest consumers of Nintendo and other distributors software.

I can't believe you kept a straight face while typing that rubbish :cuckoo:

To suggest anyone deriding you is a nintendo fanboy is also utter ****. I'd say the same of any console. I don't think any one of them is more likely to induce a fit than another.

Where you get this "similar light sequences" rubbish from I don't know.

While the above report may be correct it doesn't mean it's entirely representative either. For all we know the guy only looked at GC games.

But at the end of the day it doesn't matter. All games IIRC, have epilepsy warnings in the manuals so everyone should be aware

werewolf
15-06-2004, 16:15
Professor Graham Harding, former director of the Neurosciences Research Institute at Aston University and world expert on photosensitive epilepsy, has discovered that four Nintendo computer games contain flashing repetitive light sequences that may induce epileptic seizures in photosensitive children.

and how many games have repetative flashing lights?
Practically any game with a "muzzle flash" could be said to have a repetative light for example.

it does sound like he only looked at the nintendo games and didn't bother investigating other consoles/games.


As others have already said, the warnings about the possibility of seizures have been in pretty much every games manual and console manual i've ever read, usually near the front.
In the case of Nintendo's Zelda for example it contains a second booklet with "warnings and precautions" with a warning and the main manual says to read it (as something like paragraph 3 of the inside cover).

I think even the original Tetris on the Gameboy had the warning.

Jimmyboy
15-06-2004, 18:53
Originally posted by camaj
I can't believe you kept a straight face while typing that rubbish :cuckoo:

Where you get this "similar light sequences" rubbish from I don't know.

oh shut up you hard on. :lol:


Anyways, I think the point about the ratio of games on the Nintendo format which contain repetitive light and flashing sequences to that of the other main consoles is a perfectly sound one and nobody seems to have any answers as to how the accusations both from medical scientists and Joe public are virtually all directed at Nintendo.

Maxamillion
15-06-2004, 19:35
As its the Sun, its biased, so theres probably some link between Murdoch and Sony. So they're giving Nintendo a bit of a kicking.

[HB]RugRat
15-06-2004, 22:08
Tabloid newspaper in bull-edit story shocker!!!!111oneone

neverland
16-06-2004, 14:03
As a nintendo fan-boy, I can still see how it's possible that certain games on the Nintendo consoles could cause more of a problem. For example, isn't the Rainbow Road road track made up of short brightly coloured sections, so as you race down that, large sections of the screen are going to be quickly changing colour, which is surely more likely to cause problems than a little muzzle flash in the middle of the screen in Sony's latest dimly lit shoot-the-prostitutes controversy-fest. (See I told you I was a Nintendo fan-boy ;) )

Would people get so het up if it was suggested that Top of the Pops is more likely to trigger seizures than Panorama? I think not.

Having said that, the Sun's coverage is demented in the extreme.

"we need guidelines like those in broadcasting to make sure games with flashing light patterns that have the potential to cause an attack are eliminated."

Er, right. So have the Big Brother eviction night programmes been "eliminated"? No, they just usually have a warning at the beginning that it will contain flash photography. Now if they want to stick an extra warning, over and above the general epilepsy warning on these supposedly dangerous games fair enough. But talk of banning them is as ridiculous as calling for a ban on flashing lights in nightclubs and press photograpers' flash-bulbs for the same reasons.

Paul Lynock
16-06-2004, 15:05
Originally posted by neverland
Er, right. So have the Big Brother eviction night programmes been "eliminated"? No, they just usually have a warning at the beginning that it will contain flash photography. Now if they want to stick an extra warning, over and above the general epilepsy warning on these supposedly dangerous games fair enough. But talk of banning them is as ridiculous as calling for a ban on flashing lights in nightclubs and press photograpers' flash-bulbs for the same reasons.

And then how about banning hedges and trees next to roads, so driving past them on a sunny day won't produce flashing patterns? :nuts:

You can give as many warnings as you like, if the person playing the game isn't known to have epilepsy, they ain't gonna listen to the warnings, are they? If they have been diagnosed with epilepsy, then they should already be taking care when playing games- especially if it isn't being controlled with medication. I was told when I was younger, that if I was ever put in a position where there were flashing lights and/or visual patterns that made me feel funny, I should close my eyes (or at least one of them). If this is common advice, then there shouldn't really be much of a problem. At least, I've never had a problem while playing games anymore :searchme: And to be perfectly honest, I'd much rather be diagnosed with epilepsy after having a seizure whilst playing a game, rather than be driving a car or walking past a frozen canal or lake (the latter of which has actually happened to me, and if nobody was there to pull me out, it's very likely that I wouldn't be here now)

There are many other films and games that have these 'patterns', and I'm sure you could find a bunch of PS2 or Xbox titles that could be labelled with a similar criticism. To say "Nintendo games are more likely to cause seizures", you really would have to test every single game on each of the current systems- I'm really sure that's what they've done... :| The fact is, Nintendo are probably the most instantly recognisable video game company of all time- and it's only too easy to point the finger at them. I'd be the first to raise my hands and whole-heartedly admit there are a couple of small sections in Metroid prime that contain light flashes (IIRC, it's when the power goes out)- but calling for it to be banned as well as holding Nintendo solely responsible is just :nono: IMO.

And I wouldn't really be surprised if there's been more claims of seizures caused by Nintendo games, tbh. You must remember that they've been in the business longer than Sony and Microsoft put together, and their consoles are generally aimed at a younger age group (flame proof jacket- check :D). Younger people are far more susceptible to these images, by the way. Maybe they should be taking more care while designing their games- but like I said before, I had a seizure while playing ISS Pro on the PlayStation. Does that contain flashing lights, or anything that would obviously cause this to happen? :searchme:

Oh, and I'm most definitely not a Nintendo fanboy. I own all three of the current generation of consoles, and the GC is actually my first Nintendo console. So nerrr :p

neverland
16-06-2004, 15:46
Originally posted by Paul Lynock
You can give as many warnings as you like, if the person playing the game isn't known to have epilepsy, they ain't gonna listen to the warnings, are they? If they have been diagnosed with epilepsy, then they should already be taking care when playing games- especially if it isn't being controlled with medication.

I agree that the warnings wouldn't be much use, but they'd also not do any harm, and may stop tabloid whining a bit. I heard on the radio today somone claimed they had a TV remote control with a label warning not to put it in the dishwasher. So pointless warnings wouldn't be a new thing.

Oh, and I'm most definitely not a Nintendo fanboy. I own all three of the current generation of consoles, and the GC is actually my first Nintendo console. So nerrr :p

Well I own all 4 of the current consoles, and the GC and the GBA are easily the best so nerrrrrrrrrrrr

Actually, come to think of it, if flickering images are a problem all those jaggies on PS2 games must be a bit dangerous... :razz:

JayX
16-06-2004, 17:29
surely you either have epilepsy or you don't, nothing these games are doing is "giving" anyone epilepsy, just triggering it? i'd rather find out at a young age surrounded by family, than at 20 years old in a nightclub with all my mates (and myself) slammed up on drink.

Pistol
17-06-2004, 09:06
Played Chronicles of Riddick on the Xbox last night, and that has some serious flashing going on at points. Great game, but flickering fluorescent lights do my nut in enough in real life without having 'em in games, thanks very much.

Easily worse than any 'flashing light patterns' I have seen on any Gamecube game. But do we see any Xbox condemnations? No, because that professor bloke probably was only given a Gamecube to do his research on.

I can't believe that it is only Nintendo games/consoles that can have this effect on you. Quite apart from the whole molehill>mountain issue, this 'research' seems very sketchy and biased.

Way_2_FAT
17-06-2004, 09:08
To sum it up, it's all BS... :|

sigur
17-06-2004, 09:31
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
There's a proven medical link and Nintendo have been condemned considerably more than any other manufacturer of consoles for a considerably longer period of time. Now you can either believe that there's some global conspiracy by medial research teams the world over to put a fat plumber out of business or you can except that maybe they have a point.

Can you show us this proof?

Sounds a bit like Brass Eye to me:searchme:

cjb110
17-06-2004, 09:32
I think the idea about taking the warning labels off everything applies here:D

I could see it if they were saying the certain types of game are more prone to causing problems, say fast moving high contrast (or whatever it is that is the cause) But they can't say its nintendo, theyr could just about blame the connection method or tv (though tv setup is more likely at fault than the tv)

But whatever it is its irrelevant, the warnings exist already it your choice if you ignore them or not. If your favorite game causes problems then well tough, you can't have everything.

ryonhilluk
17-06-2004, 15:30
Originally posted by sigur
Can you show us this proof?

Sounds a bit like Brass Eye to me:searchme:

I too would like to see some of this 'proof'.

smst
17-06-2004, 21:33
Originally posted by Jimmyboy
Anyways, I think the point about the ratio of games on the Nintendo format which contain repetitive light and flashing sequences to that of the other main consoles is a perfectly sound one and nobody seems to have any answers as to how the accusations both from medical scientists and Joe public are virtually all directed at Nintendo.
I'm not convinced about the correctness of the phrase "virtually all", there; I just don't know if it's true that virtually all such complaints are against Nintendo. Even if they were, I'd be more inclined to take notice if the scientists were definitely testing a wide range of hardware and a range of games across the platforms (including multi-platform titles).

Again, I'm not saying that I can't believe some titles contain moving images which can trigger seizures -- I just don't see that Nintendo are particularly to blame over any other company. Without thoroughly testing other games, it's surely impossible to draw any conclusion which singles out a single manufacturer or publisher.

sigur
18-06-2004, 08:29
Originally posted by ryonhilluk
I too would like to see some of this 'proof'.

I think he is dodging the thread;)

aliflack
18-06-2004, 12:21
yeah come on jimmyboy - all these medical teams world-wide that have done all that scientific research, what none of them actually published a paper?

No journal articles you want to point us in the direction of???

Don't say there's scientific proof unless you can actually produce it - otherwise you're just spouting rubbish :nono:

lochwinnoch
18-06-2004, 12:27
I've suffered from seizures after playing games. But I can't agree that it's a company's fault - it's much more likely to be connected with flashing light & speeds of them. I believe this because I seem to have a pre-emptive warning system before having a seizure which involves a particular feeling and flashing light in my vision. Strobe lighting (e.g. at nightclubs) is particularly bad for me - luckily this 'warning system' means I know the flashing is affecting me so I can leave and prevent a seizure later in the night.

After suffering 3 seizures only when playing games, I was fully tested in hospital (EEG, Cat Scan, being subjected to very bright flashing light at different speeds) and found to not be epileptic. It's just something I get along with - and actually, looking too closely at a TV screen also triggers it off.